Where to buy uv light: Uv Fluorescent Light : Target

UV Disinfecting Lights | Shop Wall Mount UV Light Sanitizers, Hanging & Handheld UV Disinfecting Lights For Sale

UV Light Disinfection

The mainstream, prevalent use of UV light in established industries, such as food processing, wastewater treatment and healthcare (hospitals), reinforces the viability of UV disinfecting lights, making it a tried-and-tested solution. Reliability and peace of mind are the secondary benefits that come with UV light sanitation, as this disinfection method has been around for decades.

To ensure proper disinfection, UV-C light intensity, duration, exposure and deployment should be carefully maximized. Using a variety of UV lights and devices, from portable UV disinfection carts and UV air sanitizers to compact UV hand lamps and UV sanitation boxes, is recommended for a complete approach to sanitation on the field or in facilities.

Frequently Asked Questions

What Are UV Disinfection Lights?

UV disinfection uses Ultraviolet light germicidal irradiation (UVGI) as a disinfection method. UV lights emit short-wavelength ultraviolet light that kill or inactivate micro-organisms such as bacteria, molds, viruses and other pathogens. The use of ultraviolet light been an accepted practice since the mid-20th century, primarily within medical sanitation and sterile work facilities. However UV light sanitizers have been increasingly employed to sterilize drinking and wastewater and in recent years, UV sterilization lights have found renewed application in air purifiers.

Where are UV Disinfecting Lights Used?

UV light disinfection is used in a variety of applications, such as food, air, healthcare room and water purification. Handheld UV Disinfection Lights can disinfect corona virus and bacteria on surfaces including work stations, machines, tables and more. When used in conjunction with filters, air duct UV disinfection lights can be used to purify circulating air. UV disinfection is used hospitals, food service, clean rooms, water treatment facilities and other applications where microorganisms are a threat. Disinfecting light can also be used to disinfect the interior surfaces of vehicles in between rides. It also has applications in the retail to disinfect shopping carts, counters and in industrial and commercial offices settings. Here is a sample of places where UV disinfecting lights are used.

What are the benefits of UV Light Disinfection?

  • Non Toxic
  • Defeats micro-organisms such as bacteria, molds, viruses and other pathogens
  • Inhibits micro-organism growth on surfaces when used in a regimen
  • Ease of use
  • Affordable, cost effective
  • UV offers a key advantage over chlorine-based disinfection, due to its ability to inactivate protozoa that threaten public health – most notably Cryptosporidium and Giardia.


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Does UV Light Kill Viruses? Best Sterilizer Devices 2021

Does UV Light Kill Viruses? Best Sterilizer Devices 2021 | The Strategist

Every product is independently selected by (obsessive) editors. Things you buy through our links may earn us a commission.

strategist investigates

By
Liza Corsillo,
a senior writer at the Strategist covering kids’ toys and men’s style. 
She joined the Strategist in 2019. She is a former writer for GQ and an accomplished illustrator.

12 items in this article
3 items on sale!

12 items in this article
3 items on sale!

An employee of the Chilean-Brazilian airline LATAM monitors the operation of a robot that uses UV light to clean the interior of the aircraft.
Photo: Nelson Almeida/AFP via Getty Images

We first heard about the disinfecting powers of UV-C light (ultraviolet light with a wavelength between 200 and 280 nanometers — and the same light that causes sunburn and skin-cell mutation in humans) while talking to certified sex coach Gigi Engle about the best rabbit and bullet vibrators you can buy online. She uses a UV-light sterilization pouch to clean her sex toys of bacteria that could lead to yeast infections or bacterial vaginosis. According to her, UV light is much more convenient than soap and water. “You just need to wipe off your toys and pop them in the pouch and you’re done,” she says.

That made us wonder: If UV light is better than soap at cleaning sex toys, what else might it be useful for cleaning? To find out, we talked to five medical professionals (and one Strategist staffer who swears by her UV-light-blasting water bottle). Eric Lee, a St. Louis–based physician, says that “UV light, the type used in most common devices on the market to clean household objects, has been shown to be effective in laboratory studies at killing bacteria on computer screens, toothbrushes, and other objects. It has also been shown to affect viruses in similar ways that it affects bacteria.” According to Alex Berezow, a microbiologist and senior editor at Big Think who has written on the topic, “UV light is lethal to bacteria and viruses because of its high frequency that scrambles and damages their nuclear material. When it damages the DNA (or RNA) code of these pathogens, it also triggers lethal mutations that prevent them from reproducing properly.” (As we all protect ourselves from unnecessary coronavirus exposure, we also asked if the existing technology was effective against it. According to Dr. Aaron Glatt, the chair of medicine at Mount Sinai South Nassau and a spokesman for the Infectious Diseases Society of America, “there’s just not enough evidence to say whether [UV light devices] are an effective tool against COVID-19 or not. ” Berezow, however, says, considering that “UV light kills everything — bacteria, fungi, viruses — it should kill coronavirus.” What we do know for sure is that it is effective against other viruses like the flu.)

With their advice in mind, we found a number of devices that use UV light to kill a range of dangerous bacteria and viruses from MRSA to E. coli. One of them is a UV-light-emitting robot that quite literally zaps operating rooms clean of all pathogens. Another is a giant UV light wand designed by Boeing to disinfect the insides of airplanes.

Outside of those industrial uses, there are a bunch of portable UV sanitizing boxes, wands, and water bottles that claim to kill 99. 9 percent of bacteria and viruses on phones, toothbrushes, pacifiers, and a number of other surfaces. We’ve found the best available online and included them below. Note that, while none have been proven to kill the coronavirus, a number of them have been put through rigorous third-party lab testing to support their claims. And just in case we need to say it, UV light should never be used on the skin or any other part of the body. Also, you should be careful not to look at it when using a UV-light device to clean objects or surfaces.

[Editors’ note: No matter how effective these devices are at killing germs, none of them can replace frequent hand-washing, social distancing, and wearing face masks.]

Munchkin Portable UV Sterilizer

$20

com/strategist/_components/clay-paragraph/instances/ck7kwb61n00ht3h67txx8jxiu@published” data-word-count=”139″>Linda Lee, environmental health expert and chief medical affairs and science officer at UV Angel, says UV light and chemicals like bleach or ethanol are equally effective methods for sanitizing surfaces. She suggests using whatever cleansing method is available to you, but points out that, in some situations, UV treatment can be superior. “For instance, chemical treatment might be difficult for a baby’s pacifier, because the way chemicals work, there’s a residual left behind that continues to treat the surface,” she says. So maybe don’t scrub your baby’s pacifier with a Clorox wipe and then hand it right back to them. Another benefit of UV light over wipes or paper towels is that you create less waste. Although Linda Lee has not tested this product, Munchkin claims that it has been put through rigorous testing by an independent lab.

59S Nursery Sterilizer

$130

com/strategist/_components/clay-paragraph/instances/ckbwhv007001u3h67ihz0fcvp@published” data-word-count=”47″>This sanitizer, also made by Munchkin and 59S, is designed to sanitize larger things like kids’ toys, baby bottles, cell phones, or other household items. It takes just five minutes to kill 99.9 percent of bacteria and viruses. Plus, it’s lightweight and folds down for easy carrying.

$130

at Munchkin

Buy

Coral UV Sterilizer and Dryer

$169

$169

Here’s a similar sanitizer from Coral UV that fits up to four bottles with caps and nipples. And its effectiveness has been tested by an independent laboratory.

$169

at Coral UV

Buy

BVibe UV Sterilizer Pouch

$85

com/strategist/_components/clay-paragraph/instances/ck7kwbio100hw3h67cw1wwg2r@published” data-word-count=”125″>The skin in and around your private parts is extra sensitive. So whatever you use to clean your vibrators, butt plugs, and menstrual cups should be gentle and shouldn’t leave a chemical residue. Cleaning sex toys is especially important if they are used by more than one person, says Eric Lee, an ER physician, medical director of several nursing homes, and medical expert for Invigor Medical. “It is completely appropriate to want to disinfect it thoroughly between uses. A single exposure to certain pathogens during sex can lead to lifelong illness,” he says. Engle uses bVibe’s pouch sterilizer because it’s way less bulky than the bigger boxes like the Uvee Home Play and easier to travel with. “That’s a big plus because I’m international,” she says.

HoMedics UV-Clean Portable Sanitizer

$80 now 80% off

$16

com/strategist/_components/clay-paragraph/instances/ck9k9wlbo002j3h67gezbnmwv@published” data-word-count=”222″>Berezow, Eric Lee, and Linda Lee all agree that UV light is most effective when used to disinfect something that is likely to come into contact with germs from multiple people. So under normal circumstances, or if you’re staying mostly home due to social distancing and not touching anything from outside your personal bubble because of coronavirus, “the germs on your phone are most likely the same germs that are normally found on your hands,” says Berezow. Since most people touch their phones thousands of times a day, killing those germs is rendered pointless once you pick it up and start swiping again. That said, if you leave the house to go grocery shopping, you should be cleaning your phone when you return — preferably before cleaning your hands. You can do that with an alcohol or Clorox wipe, or you can drop your phone in a box like this (though, again, UV light has not yet been proven to kill the coronavirus). And in general, if your baby drops their pacifier on the grocery-store floor or shares a toy with every kid on the playground, disinfecting it with UV light could reduce the spread of germs. This UV sanitizer from 59S can be used to disinfect phones and keys as well as small objects like pacifiers, toys, or even teething rings.

$16

at Amazon

Buy

$16

at Amazon

Buy

Totallee UV Phone Sanitizer

$99

$99

This UV-light sanitizing box fits a phone, keys, or other small objects. Plus it doubles as a wireless charger.

$99

at Totallee

Buy

59S UV Light Sanitizer Wand

$120

$120

“I think these devices would make more sense in public places,” says Berezow, who strongly believes that industrial UV-light devices could reduce the transmission of diseases on a large scale if used in airplanes, restaurants, and other places where people congregate. “Unfortunately it’s an inconvenience and expensive,” he says. For now, and as an alternative to chemical cleaners, many UV sanitizing wands have been shown to work about as well as a Clorox wipe at killing bacteria and viruses on smooth nonporous surfaces like airplane tray tables or cell phones. After looking into the research around UV wands for the Strategist, Berezow says, “I would say that UV-light wands may be useful as an alternative to chemical cleaners on tabletops or other ‘plain’ surfaces.” But he couldn’t find any information regarding rough services like fabric or hotel bed sheets. Purvi Parikh, an immunologist and allergist with Allergy & Asthma Network, says that portable devices such as this “are helpful on surfaces and objects such as your phone but should not be used on your skin.” 59s recently came out with this folding UV-light wand that shuts off automatically to protect your eyes when it is turned upside down. According to the manufacturer, its lights have a life span of 10,000 hours, and it can kill up to 99. 9 percent of germs on keyboards, desks, sofas, and bathtubs in just three minutes.

$120

at 59S

Buy

Monos CleanPod UVC Sterilizer

$90

$90

During the pandemic Canadian luggage company Monos pivoted from making hard-shell suitcases to this sleek UV-light sterilization wand. Monos is donating a portion of the proceeds from sales to the United Way India COVID-19 National Response Fund.

$90

at Monos

Buy

VeriClean Portable UV-C Wand

$110

$110

Like the options above, this portable UV-light wand is designed to kill 99.9 percent of surface bacteria as well as most viruses and mold spores. For best results, the brand recommends holding it two to three inches away from the object you want to sterilize, for at least ten to 20 seconds. It’s also important to note that this wand will not shut off when turned upside down. So you should use caution to not look directly at the light when using it.

LARQ Bottle

From
$118

From
$118

Buy at Amazon

Buy

From
$95

at Larq

Buy

CrazyCap Water Purifier (Cap Only) with UV-C LED

$59

$59

Buy at The Grommet

Buy

$59

at Walmart

Buy

There are also several water bottles and bottle caps that harness UV light to kill germs in your water, reducing bad odors and in some cases making the water safer to drink. Strategist associate director of audience development, Stephanie Downes, who is immunodeficient and extra sensitive to bacteria due to her Crohn’s disease, got a Larq water bottle as a gift from her sister after several water bottles with built-in filters didn’t work for her. She says “because of my Crohn’s I can’t drink water from the tap. At home, I have a Berkey filter, but it’s nice to have this with me when I am out of the house so I can pour tap water in, press a button, and make it drinkable.” For a slightly less expensive way to sanitize your water, you can purchase this UV bottle cap that fits most S’well-shaped water bottles.

Katadyn Ultra Water Purifier

$120

$120

The rechargeable Katadyn SteriPEN water purifier uses UV-C light to kill 99.9 percent of protozoa (including diarrhea-causing Giardia and Cryptosporidia), bacteria and even viruses. It was designed for backpackers and travelers as a waste-reducing alternative to buying bottled water. The company claims it can sterilize 16 fluid ounces of hot or cold water in less than a minute and 32 ounces in 90 seconds.

$120

at REI

Buy

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Does UV Light Kill Viruses and Germs?

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UV lamps | atoll – water filters

Sterilight UV lamps use UV energy to destroy microbiological contaminants. This method finds application for cottages, houses, laboratories, restaurants, hospitals, industrial enterprises, collective water supply systems.

The Sterilight UV lamp neutralizes all known pathogens with a large margin of safety. E. coli, dysentery bacillus, cholera and typhoid pathogens, hepatitis and influenza viruses, salmonella, Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium cysts die at an irradiation dose of less than 10 mJ/cm2. Meanwhile, the Sterilight UV lamp provides a radiation dose of at least 30 mJ/cm2.

Water disinfection:

Water enters through the lower port of the ultraviolet reaction chamber and flows around a powerful mercury lamp, thermally protected by a quartz tube. The wavelength of the ultraviolet lamp is 253. 7 nm. The radiation destroys DNA molecules in the cells of bacteria and microorganisms, preventing their reproduction. The water leaving through the upper port is sterilized and ready for consumption.

Sterilight UV lamps use modern technology to solve age-old problems. Water from any source can be bacteriologically contaminated. This problem is more often faced by residents of rural areas without centralized water supply. It is not recommended to consume water from surface sources without appropriate sterilization, despite an encouraging analysis of water.

Unlike traditional water disinfection methods such as chlorination (in which chlorine reacts with organic compounds to give water an unpleasant taste and odor, and also forms carcinogens such as chloroform), Sterilight sterilizes water with ultraviolet radiation without introducing additional impurities.

Thus, this is the simplest, most effective and inexpensive method of water disinfection.

General features of Sterilight systems:
  • Reaction chambers in polished 304 or 316 stainless steel.
  • Quartz lamp tubes designed for a wide range.
  • High efficiency UV lamps.
  • Sound and light alarm system when the lamp is turned off.
  • Irradiation intensity control device with result indication on the display.
  • Corrosion resistant anodized stainless steel ports.
  • Thermistors for control panel and reaction chamber.
  • Operating time counter.
  • Solenoid valves and remote control systems.
  • Electropolishing for extra pure water.
  • Products are available in various designs and configurations.
Inlet water requirement:
  • Max. pressure – 8.6 atm.
  • Operating temperature range – 2 – 40 °C.
  • The concentration of total iron is not more than 0.3 mg/L.
  • Hydrogen sulfide concentration – not more than 0.05 mg/l.
  • Suspended solids content – no more than 10 mg / l.
  • Manganese concentration – not more than 0.05 mg/l.
  • Water hardness – not more than 2.5 meq/l.

If the parameters of the source water exceed the above values, it is necessary to ensure the appropriate pre-treatment of the water.

UV detector


You need an ultraviolet detector. I bought the cheapest one.
In short, don’t buy.
Shows wrong.

In our area, the maximum UV index cannot be more than 9, and then in June, at noon. And this device shows a UV index of 15, in May, at 11 o’clock. Which was the proof for the marketplace.
Index 15, these are the maximum readings.
Some measurements have been taken. (with what is)
It does not react at all to a bactericidal lamp of the DRB-8 type.
It reacts weakly to not the weakest ultraviolet flashlight, and then point blank.
Uviolet glass weakens the sun more than window glass.
It reacts to an ordinary incandescent lamp 60 watts with a reflector from a distance of 10 cm, see the photo below:
Works with two AAA batteries or from USB (the indicator in the form of a plug appears). There is a battery level indicator.

The pay looks pretty good. Everything is soldered evenly. Too hard for a fake device.

Turns off when battery voltage drops below 2.1.
Current consumption from batteries:
at 3 volts – 20 mA
at 2.1 V – 30 mA.
Which is too much.
The backlight works constantly, consumes 5 mA from a five-volt converter and does not turn off. Although the cathode output of the backlight diode goes to the microcontroller. So, theoretically, it can be turned off programmatically. Why do you need a backlight in a device that works in the light, I do not understand.

Buttons A and B, according to the instructions, designed for different tasks, give the same result. Although they are included in the diagram so that there is a difference between them.
The board is equipped with a converter that increases up to 5 volts, a microcontroller.

When the UV photodiode is checked by a multimeter in the diode test mode, it glows faintly with white light.