Note of e: E music note – music theory

E music note – music theory

E note in treble clef

Here is an E note on a staff (stave ) with a treble clef:

The treble clef set the position of the G note on the second line from the bottom, so an E note can be written on the first of the staff (starting from the bottom).

E note in bass clef

Here is an E note on a staff with a bass clef:

The bass clef set the position of the F note on the fourth line from the bottom, so an E note can be written on the third space of the staff (from the bottom).

E music note on a piano keyboard

Here are some E notes on a piano keyboard:

how to find the E note on a piano keyboard?

It’s very simple! Do you see the black keys? There are two black keys, then three, then two, then three, and so on. The keys for E are just after the last of the two consecutive black keys.

The note E as tonic

The E note is the first music note (the tonic) of the E major scale and of the E minor scale:

E major scale

E minor scales

Remember that there are four kinds of minor scales:

E natural minor scale:

E harmonic minor scale

E ascending melodic minor scale

E descending melodic minor scale

The E note as leading tone (leading note)

The E note is the leading tone (leading note ) of the F Major scale and of the F harmonic minor scale:

F Major scale:

F harmonic minor scale:

Frequency in Hertz of the E note (E4)

The scientific pitch notation (also known as American standard pitch notation) symbolizes the following E note as E4:

Depending on the tuning of the musical note A (A4) and in an equal-tempered scale, the frequency of the note E may vary:

If A4 = 440 Hertz: this E note (E4) has a frequency of 329. 63 Hz
If A4 = 442 Hertz: this E note (E4) has a frequency of 331.13 Hz

Note: These frequency values ​​in Hertz are valid only for the equal temperament. In other words, these frequencies correspond to the notes on a well-tuned piano.

The E note with different clefs

Obviously, there are several E notes spread out over many octaves. Here are some E notes in different clefs:

Some E notes with a treble clef (G clef)

Here are some E notes with a treble clef:

Some E notes with a bass clef

Here are some E notes with a bass clef:

Some E notes with a tenor clef

Here are some E notes with a tenor clef:

Some E notes with an alto clef

Here are some E notes with an alto clef:

Some E notes with a mezzo-soprano clef

Here are some E notes with a mezzo-soprano clef:

Some E notes with a soprano clef

Here are some E notes with a soprano clef:

Some E notes with a baritone clef

Here are some E notes with a baritone clef:

Scales starting with an E note

Here are all major scales and all minor scales starting with an E note:

E major scale:

E natural minor scale:

E harmonic minor scale:

E ascending melodic minor scale:

E descending melodic minor scale:

Enharmonic equivalents

Here are the enharmonic notes of E:

Notes:

  • Enharmonic notes are notes that have the same pitch but not the same name.
  • D double sharp is enharmonic to E because the double sharp raises the pitch by two half steps (semitones ), and because there are two half steps between D and E.
  • F flat is enharmonic to E because the flat lowers the pitch by one half step and because is only one half step between E and F.

The note E and accidentals

Here are all the possible accidentals you can find with the note E and their positions on a piano keyboard:

Open E Tuning on Guitar | How to Tune to Open E

One way to advance your skill as a guitar player is to experiment with alternate tunings. There are a variety of popular tunings that guitarists have utilized in all kinds of creative ways, adding new dimensions to the sounds they create. One of these ways is using “open” tunings, which involve tuning all six guitar strings so that all of the open notes together form the notes of a major chord.

In this lesson, we’ll focus on open E tuning. We’ll demonstrate how to tune to open E, discuss why you may want to experiment with alternate tunings, and review some examples of how open E tuning has been used in popular music.

Lesson: How to Open E Tune a Guitar

Open tunings allow guitarists to strum all six open strings to play full chords. The E major chord is a powerful open chord, which already uses three open notes in standard tuning. To tune to open E, the other three strings are tuned up, either a whole step or half step.

What is Open E Tuning?

Open E tuning offers just a slight tweak on standard tuning, adjusting three of the strings to form an open E major chord across all six strings.

If you visualize an E major chord in open position, you’ll need to tune the 3rd, 4th, and 5th strings up so that the open notes of those strings become the notes that would normally be fretted for the E major chord.

For a starting point, here are the notes on a guitar in standard tuning:
E (lowest string)
— A
— D
— G
— B
— E (highest string)

In open E tuning, the standard G string would be tuned up one half step, to G#; the standard D string would be tuned up one whole step, to E; and the standard A string would be also be tuned up one whole step, to B:

— E (lowest string)
— B
— E
— G#
— B
— E (highest string)



Here’s how you would adjust your strings from standard tuning to open E:
Start by plucking the 5th (A) string.

Turn the tuning peg for this string away from you, raising the pitch of the string.

Keep turning the peg and plucking the string until you reach the note B.
Pro tip: The Fender Online guitar tuner can help you tune your guitar to the correct note. You can use either the Electric Guitar Online Guitar Tuner or the Acoustic Guitar Online Tuner, or download the app to your phone. Both the web and app versions give you the ability to adjust your settings and tune specifically to open E and other alternate tunings.
The string should have the same tone as the B string, although that string will be an octave higher.

Next, do the same thing with the 4th (D) string, tuning it up one full step to E. This should match the tone of both the 6th string (one octave lower) and the 1st string (one octave higher).

Lastly, move over to the 3rd (G) string, and tune this one up just a half step to G#.

If you’ve tuned correctly, you should be able to hear all the familiar notes of an E major chord when you strum across all six open strings. It’s possible you may have to go back and readjust some of the newly tuned strings, until your guitar adjusts to the new tension of these three strings.

Why Learn Open E Tuning?

Tuning your guitar to open E accomplishes a few different things. First, it allows you to play major chords at various points along the fretboard by simply barring your finger across any one fret. For this reason, it’s a popular tuning for slide guitar players.

Another reason why guitarists enjoy playing in open tunings is because it allows them to play different variations of chords that take advantage of the ringing of open strings. They can also easily play harmonics across the 5th, 7th, 12th frets that form pleasant-sounding major chords.

Songs That Use Open E Tuning

Open E tuning can be used in many genres, but it has probably most often been put to use in rock and blues music.

Because E major is a frequently used key for blues, the open E tuning is often used by blues guitarists, particularly slide guitarists. Blues pioneers like Bo Diddley experimented with the tuning — most notably heard on his self-titled tune, “Bo Diddley.”

Bridging the gap between rock and blues, The Rolling Stones’ Keith Richards was a huge fan of open tunings, and he leaned heavily on the use of jangling open strings as part of his trademark style. Iconic songs like “Jumpin Jack Flash” and “Gimme Shelter” use open E and make use of lush chords and frequent hammer-on and pull-off fills.

Bob Dylan was so enamored with open E tuning that he wrote his entire Blood on the Tracks album using the tuning (though some songs were later recorded using standard tuning). You can hear some of the beautiful chord voicings he was able to achieve with open strings on a song like “Shelter From the Storm.”

A more modern use of the tuning is on the Black Crowes’ 1990 hit single “She Talks to Angels,” where the acoustic guitar moves freely between sections of melodic chords, sliding lead phrases, and carefully placed harmonics.

Check Out Fender Play Guitar Lessons

Branching out with alternate tunings can be a real challenge. It forces you to reimagine the fretboard and learn new sets of chord shapes. However, these tunings can open up new possibilities and expand the depth of sounds you can create on the guitar. Sometimes a new tuning can give a guitarist a completely fresh perspective and provide a new canvas on which to experiment. With a free trial of Fender Play, you can work on mastering open E tuning, or a few useful open tunings, like open D or open G.


Note in Excel. How to edit notes

Excel file extension

How to insert video in Excel

To be honest, I hardly use notes in Excel. In my opinion, it’s easier to add an extra comment column to the table. But there are times when you simply cannot do without this tool. For example, if you need to add a comment to a sheet that cannot be changed or add a comment to the picture.

Note is a review tool, i. e. with it, you can make comments on the document, which it is desirable not to change.

Let’s start from simple to complex

Contents

  • 1. How to create a note in Excel. Edit, delete note
  • 2. How to insert a picture in a note in Excel
  • 3. Print notes
  • 4. Copy/paste notes
  • 6. How to add an Excel note, another way
  • 7. How to change note author name
  • Similar articles

1. How to create a note in Excel. Edit, delete note

Highlight the cell where you want to add a comment, right-click, and in the menu that appears, click “ Insert Comment”. See illustration. After that, you can immediately type the text of the message. In the note field, the author is written automatically. You can resize the note by dragging the size of the window. When you have finished typing, you can click anywhere in the table.

To delete a note, select it, right-click again and select Delete Note.

To show all comments on a sheet, go to menu “Review” – “Notes” and select item “Show all comments”.

To change the text of the note, simply click inside the box and change the text. All the text editing buttons on the “Home” panel, font size, italics, and so on work here. With the right mouse button, you can select “note format”, there you can edit this window and text almost as you like.

2. How to insert a picture into a note in Excel

Select the desired cell and right-click. In the menu that opens, select item “Edit note”. Select item “Note format” – “Colors and lines” . In section “Filling” in the field “color” select “Filling methods …”. Now we go to the tab “Picture” and use the button “Picture . ..”, now select the desired image on the hard disk.

3. Printing notes

Without advanced settings, Excel will not print notes. The easiest way to make these settings is by going to the tab “Page layout” – “Page settings” – “Print headers”

were printed.

Select “at the end of the sheet” – it means that all notes will be placed at the end of the page or “as on the sheet” – i.e. as we see in the electronic document.

4. Copying/pasting notes

If you need to transfer notes to another sheet, select the cell(s) with comments, copy the data. Now use the special paste in another cell (Ctrl + Alt + V). In the field “notes” put a tick.

Now the fun part

5. How to change the note field shape

To do this, select the note, then select the “change shape” command, unfortunately, the command is not available on the top panel, so the easiest way is to put it on the quick panel access (where there is a diskette with saving).

This is done like this:

The round button in the upper left corner, i.e. “File” – “Excel Options” – “Settings” . We select item “Select commands from:” in the drop-down list we find “All commands” then in the left field we look for “Change shape” – the labels are arranged there alphabetically. Click the Add button to move it to the right column. “OK”.

The top bar now has a button “Change Shape” . With the note box highlighted, click this button and select the shape. For example, as in the first picture with the flag.

6. How to add an Excel note, another way

Sometimes it’s inconvenient when notes constantly pop up when hovering over them, or you need to add two comments to one cell.

This uses an optional feature of the Data Validation tool to create another type of annotation. Choose “Data” – “Work with data” – “Data validation”.

A standard window will open, select item “Message to enter” and fill in the fields “Title:” (will be displayed in the first line) and “Message:” (will be displayed as a note). Don’t forget to check the box “Display tooltip if cell is current”.

When you select a cell, your comment appears.

7. How to change the name of the author of a note

If you are working in a shared Excel file, the wrong user is assigned when you create notes. It can of course be changed manually. But there is a more convenient way.

The upper left circle “File” – “Options” – “General” and at the bottom of the menu there is a field “Username:” write down the desired name.

Excel file extension

How to insert video in Excel

Sources and notes by M. Baev to the book Rediscovery of the village of Grebnevo

Sources and notes to the book “Secondary discovery of the village of Grebneva”.

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  2. Veselovsky S. B. From the history of ancient Russian land ownership. // Historical Notes of the Academy of Sciences of the USSR, vol. 18, M. 1946.
  3. Acts of the socio-economic history of North-Eastern Rus’ in the late XIV early XVI centuries. M.L.19521964, vol. 2, No. 340, p. 338.
  4. Spiritual and contractual letters of the Grand Dukes of the XIVXVI centuries. M.L. 1950, pp. 45, 47.

    4a. M. Diev. Description of the Kostroma Ipatsky Monastery. M., 1858, p. 75, 1st note (reference to Russian time Temporary. Chronicle collection. Part 1, M., 1790, p. 168).

  5. Likhachev N.P. Discharge clerks of the 16th century. SPb., 1888, pp. 377378.

    5a. Complete collection of Russian chronicles (PSRL), XXIV, pp. 206, 209.

    5b. Archimandrite Joseph. Guide to the shrine and sacred sights of Moscow and its environs. 6th edition, M., 1879, p. 140.

    5c. Historical and topographic description of the cities of the Moscow province with their districts, with the addition of historical information about the cathedrals, monasteries and famous churches located in Moscow. M., 1787. Addendum, p. 96.

  6. PSRL, vol. XVIII, pp. 190, 219, 220, 235, 237, 240.
  7. Ibid., pp. 244245.
  8. Scribes of the Moscow State. SPb. 18721875, part 1, part. 12, p. 214216.

    8a. A copy of the Introductory Book of the Trinity-Sergius Monastery of 1673. Archive of Acad. S. B. Veselovsky (Archive of the Academy of Sciences of the USSR, f. 620, op. 1, d. 150).

    8b. Russian Historical Library, vol. 9, p. 164.

  9. Kholmogorovs V. and G. Historical materials about churches and villages in the Moscow province. Issue. 5. Radonezh tithe. M., 18811911, p. 21.
  10. Zabelin I. E. Home life of queens. M., 1879, pp. 349350.
  11. Ancient Russian Vifliofika. Part VIII, pp. 376388.
  12. The uprising of I. Bolotnikov. Documents and materials. Comp. A. I. Kopanev and A. G. Mankov. M., 1959, p. 291.
  13. Shepelev I. S. Liberation and class struggle in the Russian state in 16081610. Pyatigorsk, 1957, p. 9098.
  14. The legend of Abraham Palitsyn. Preparation of the text and comments by O. A. Derzhavin and E. V. Kolosov. M.L., 1955, p. 117.
  15. Dolinin N.P. Moscow region regiments (Cossack camps) in the national liberation movement of 16111612. Kharkov, 1958.
  16. Solovyov S. M. History of Russia since ancient times. M., 19601963, book. IV, p. 659.
  17. Ibid., p. 670.
  18. Tokmakov I. F. Historical and statistical description of the village of Grebneva, M., 1903, pp. 14, 15 1 .
  19. Dolinin N.P. Moscow region regiments (Cossack camps) in the national liberation movement of 16111612. Kharkiv, 1958, p. 115.
  20. The legend of the family of princes Trubetskoy. M., 1891, p. 121.
  21. List of those buried in the Trinity-Sergius Lavra. M., 1880, No. 290.
  22. Zverinsky VV Materials for historical and statistical research on monasteries in the Russian Empire. St. Petersburg, 18921897, vol. 1, op. 25.
  23. Solovyov S. M. History of Russia since ancient times. M., 19601963, book. V, p. 284.
  24. Ibid., book. IV, p. 687.
  25. PSRL, vol. XVIII, p. 129.
  26. Sytin P. V. The history of planning and development of Moscow. Issue. 1, p. 276.
  27. State Armory of the Moscow Kremlin. Collection. M., 1952, p. 546.
  28. Ibid., pp. 509ff.
  29. Census book of 1709 (TsGADA). Quoted from Art. G. Lokhteva “From the past of the city of Fryazino”, gas. “For Communism” dated January 22, 1964, Shchelkovo.
  30. Solovyov S. M. History of Russia since ancient times. M., 19601963, book. V, p. 632.
  31. Solovyov S. M. History of Russia since ancient times. M., 19601963, book. V, p. 477; book. VI, p. 565; book. VIII, p. 468; book. XI, pp. 165, 344, 497; book. XII, pp. 261, 112, 114.
  32. Sytin P.V. History of Moscow streets. M., 1952, p. 323; Zgura V. V. Monumental monuments of Moscow. M., 1926.
  33. Solovyov S. M. History of Russia since ancient times. M., 19601963, book. V, p. 477; book. VI, p. 565; book. VIII, p. 468; book. XI, pp. 165, 344, 497; book. XII, pp. 261, 112, 114.
  34. The legend of the family of princes Trubetskoy. M., 1891, p. 179.
  35. Soloviev S. M. Decree. op., book. X, page 126.
  36. Ibid., p. 654.
  37. Kholmogorovs V. and G. Historical materials about churches and villages in the Moscow province. Issue. 5. Radonezh tithe. M., 18811911, p. 169.
  38. Bibikov A. A. Notes on the life and service of A. I. Bibikov. SPb., 1817. 2nd ed. 1865, p. 2, 3, 5.
  39. Laskovsky F. Materials for the history of engineering art in Russia. SPb., 1858. vol. IV p. 659, 660.
  40. Centenary of the War Department. SPb., 1902, no. 4, pp. 196198.
  41. Betsky I. I. Institutions and statutes relating to the upbringing of youth in Russia of both sexes. SPb., 1774.
  42. Solovyov S. M. History of Russia since ancient times. M., 19601963, book. X, pp. 504505.
  43. Shcherbatov M. M. On the damage to morals in Russia. London. 1858, p. 3940.
  44. Solovyov S. M. History of Russia since ancient times. M., 19601963, book. XI, pp. 237, 581, 583.
  45. Werner I. A. Description of the weaving trades of the Moscow province.
  46. Solovyov S. M. History of Russia since ancient times. M., 19601963, book. XIII, pp. 97, 123.
  47. Peasant industry of the XVIII beginning of the XIX century. Collection of documents prepared for printing by I. V. Meshalin. M., 1948, pp. 252254.
  48. Bogolyubov V. N. I. Novikov and his time. M., 1916, p. 330.
  49. Tokmakov I. F. Historical and statistical description of the village of Grebneva, M., 1903, p. 5.
  50. Bogolyubov V. N. I. Novikov and his time. M., 1916, pp. 439442.
  51. Solovyov S. M. History of Russia since ancient times. M., 19601963, book. XIII, p. 92.
  52. Pushkin A.S. History of the Pugachev rebellion. See note. 97 to chapter I.
  53. Ibid., see note. 55 to Ch. III.
  54. Bibikov A. A. Notes on the life and service of A. I. Bibikov. SPb., 1817, p. 242.
  55. Central State Military Historical Archive, f. 4 op. 5, d. No. 7148. List of generals and staff officers of the Russian army for 1771.
  56. Pushkin A.S. History of the Pugachev rebellion. See note. 55. The episode described in the note undoubtedly referred to G. I. Bibikov, since he actually commanded the Successor Cuirassier Regiment, although he was listed as an assistant commander. In versions of A. S. Pushkin’s note, Colonel Bibikov appears either without initials or with erroneous initials V. I. The error is suspected by the compiler of the index of names of the Complete Works of A. S. Pushkin in the publication of the Academy of Sciences of the USSR. 1950. vol. IX, part 1 p. 102.
  57. A. V. Suvorov Documents. Collection. M., 1949. vol. I, pp. 698, 699, 723.
  58. Moscow Regional Historical Archive. otd. 5. The family fund of the princes Golitsyn, bundle 58, file 550 pp. 15 of 1811 2 .
  59. The father of the owner of the estate, Bibikov Ilya Alexandrovich (16981774) began his service in the same office as chief auditor. His second son Vasily Ilyich (1747 1787) lieutenant captain of the engineering corps. // Century of the Ministry of War. SPb., 1902, no. 2, book. 2, pp. 167, 174.
  60. Materials on the history of peasant industry. M.L., 1950, vol. II, p. 294.
  61. Department of Written Sources of the State Historical Museum, f. 14, bundle 21 file 256. Letter from A. M. Golitsyn to the manager dated March 26, 1812,
  62. Decembrist uprising. Documents and materials. M.L., 19251958, vol. VIII.
  63. Tokmakov I. F. Historical and statistical description of the city of Bogorodsk. M., 1900, p. 33.
  64. Veselovsky S. B. and others. Moscow region.