Monitor thunderbolt 3: Thunderbolt 3 Monitors: Discover The True Universal Port

Best Thunderbolt Monitors for Mac

In 2023, there’s more variety of Thunderbolt monitors than ever. While Apple is in the game again, its displays at $1,600-$5,000+ won’t be the right fit for everyone. Luckily there are some great choices that are more affordable from LG, BenQ, and more. Below we’ll cover the best Thunderbolt monitors for Mac as well as what you get with a Thunderbolt monitor vs a USB-C monitor.

Update 2/20/23: New options arriving in the months ahead: Samsung announced its first Thunderbolt 5K monitor (pictured above) which will compete with Apple’s Studio Display. And Dell detailed its first 6K monitor with Thunderbolt and IPS Black technology that may be an interesting Apple Pro Display XDR alternative.

We’re still waiting on launch and pricing details for Samsung’s ViewFinity S9 Monitor and Dell says its 6K UltraSharp Monitor will land in the first half of 2023 (price still unknown). We’ll update this guide as soon as we learn more.


Thunderbolt monitors vs USB-C monitors

Thunderbolt (3 and 4) use the same physical connector as USB-C which offers single-cable connectivity and charging for Macs with monitors. While Thunderbolt 4 is available, it’s more of a rebrand of Thunderbolt 3 with the same 40 Gbps bandwidth. That’s why you see all the companies below – even Apple with its Studio Display and Pro Display XDR – use Thunderbolt 3.

So what’s the difference between Thunderbolt and USB-C monitors? The primary difference for the end-user is the ability to daisy chain up to 6 devices with Thunderbolt at up to 40 Gbps speeds (connecting one peripheral directly to the next).

That’s faster than USB-C 3.1 and 3.2 and USB4 support hasn’t arrived in monitors at this point. Thunderbolt may also mean you can avoid a hub or dock. If those features are not a big deal, you can save a good amount of money by going for a USB-C display instead of a Thunderbolt monitor.

For reference, USB-C 3.1 gen 2 can support up to 10 Gbps and USB 3. 2 supports up to 20 Gbps speeds.

However, keep in mind, many times other upgrades like panel resolution and size, I/O, and more go hand-in-hand with Thunderbolt and its greater bandwidth, hence the more expensive price. If you want to check out a look at USB-C monitors, check out our round-up:

  • Best USB-C and Thunderbolt displays for Mac

But below we’ll focus specifically on Thunderbolt monitors for Mac.

Best Thunderbolt monitors for Mac

BenQ PD3220U

The 32-inch BenQ PD3220U features Thunderbolt, 4K resolution, 95% DCI-P3 color, 85W power delivery for MacBooks, a variety of professional modes, hotkey puck, solid metal stand, lots of I/O, and portrait orientation support.

It’s a strong contender to Apple’s Studio Display but with a larger panel and several hundred dollars cheaper.

Specs:

  • 31.5-inch IPS panel
  • 4K – 3840 x 2160 resolution
  • 16:9 aspect ratio
  • 60Hz refresh rate
  • Brightness: 250 typical, 300 nits HDR peak
  • 95% DCI-P3
  • 100% sRGB
  • HDR10
  • Dual Thunderbolt 3 ports – 85W and 15W power delivery
    • Daisy chain with Thunderbolt
  • 2 x HDMI 2. 0
  • 1 x DisplayPort 1.4
  • 3 x USB 3.1
  • 1 x USB C
  • 1 x USB B
  • Headphone jack
  • Slim bezels
  • Landscape and portrait orientation support
  • MSRP: $1,199

You can usually find the BenQ PD3220U at Amazon and BH Photo.

LG 32UL950-W

This is LG’s UltraFine 32-inch Thunderbolt monitor that includes a solid feature set like two Thunderbolt 3 ports plus two USB-A ports, slim bezels, support for portrait orientation, and more.

In his full review, my colleague Jeff Benjamin found he liked the design better than LG’s other UltraFine models with many of the same features.

The one downside here compared to the BenQ above is 60W power delivery for MacBooks. But it does feature a bit higher brightness.

Specs:

  • 31.5-inch panel with nano IPS
  • 4K – 3840 x 2160 resolution
  • 60Hz refresh rate
  • DCI-P3 98%
  • 600 nits HDR peak brightness, 450 nits standard
  • VESA DisplayHDR™ 600
  • Dual Thunderbolt 3 ports (in x 1 (PD 60W) / out x 1)
    • Daisy Chain with Thunderbolt
  • 2 x USB-A
  • DisplayPort 1. 4
  • HDMI 2.0
  • 3.5mm headphone output
  • MSRP: $1,299 but often available for less

The LG 32UL950-W can be found on Amazon as well as other retailers like BH Photo.

LG UltraFine 24 & 27-inch Displays

The $1,300 27-inch UltraFine display (reviewed) was really the only option on the market to support USB-C/Thunderbolt 3 at a full 5K resolution until the Apple Studio Display was released.

But interestingly, with bandwidth being used up for the higher resolution, the 27-inch model doesn’t feature downstream Thunderbolt ports for peripherals/daisy-chaining, just USB-C.

At almost half the price, the 24-inch 4K UltraFine (full review) is a compelling option for an Apple-endorsed display for those okay with the smaller size.  With an MSRP of $700, it offers upstream and downstream Thunderbolt ports like the BenQ and LG 32UL950-W so you can daisy chain or get the full 40 Gbps speeds without having to use a separate dock.

LG 24-inch UltraFine Display

  • 23. 7-inch panel with nano IPS
  • 4K – 3840 x 2160 resolution
  • 16:9 aspect ratio
  • Brightness: 540 nits maximum
  • 60Hz refresh rate
  • 98% DCI-P3
  • 85W power delivery via Thunderbolt
  • 2x Thunderbolt (1 upstream, 1 downstream up to 40 Gbps)
  • 3x USB-C 3.1 gen 1 up to 5 Gbps
  • MSRP $699

The LG 24-inch UltraFine display is available from Amazon, Apple, BH Photo, and more.

Apple Studio Display

Apple’s Studio Display arrived alongside the new Mac Studio and marks the return to prosumer monitors after letting LG’s UltraFine series serve as its official recommendation since 2016.

Starting at $1,599 – $300 above the LG UltraFine 5K – the Studio Display Thunderbolt monitor is aimed at those who value Apple’s refined (and metal) build quality.

While it has a range of benefits, the Studio Display doesn’t offer downstream Thunderbolt ports but has three USB 3.1 Gen 1 (10 Gbps) ports.

Specs:

  • 27-inch panel
  • 5K 5120 x 2880 resolution
  • 16:9 aspect ratio
  • 60Hz refresh rate
  • 600 nits brightness
  • P3 wide color support
  • True Tone support
  • 1x Thunderbolt 3 port with 96W power delivery
  • 3x USB-C ports (3. 1 gen 2 up to 10 Gbps)
  • Built-in 12 MP ultra wide camera with Center Stage support
    • Software update promised to fix camera quality
  • 6-speaker system with Spatial Audio support
  • Studio-quality 3-mic array
  • Aluminum build
  • Supports most reference modes as Pro Display XDR except HDR
  • Price: $1599-$2,299 (depending on stand and screen finish)

Studio Display is available from Apple, Amazon, BH Photo, Best Buy, and more.

Apple Pro Display XDR

We won’t go into the full details of the Pro Display XDR. But the TL;DR is if you value the larger 32-inch screen, 6K resolution, metal build, variety of reference modes, and don’t mind paying $5,000+, it may be worth considering this over other Thunderbolt monitors.

Check out our detailed comparison along with more perspective on the Pro Display XD and Studio Display:

  • Here’s how the new Apple Studio Display compares to the Pro Display XDR and LG UltraFine
  • In defense of the (unnecessarily controversial) Apple Studio Display

Compelling 32-inch USB-C budget option

If you’re willing to forgo Thunderbolt and some of the other high-end features the monitors above offer, an interesting new display is Samsung’s Smart Monitor M8.

The successor to the M7, the Smart Monitor M8 offers a compelling package for those that want a 4K resolution, USB-C, and a large 32-inch screen for $700 (usually on sale). It even features an iMac-like design with four color choices.

Specs:

  • USB-C with up to 65W charging
  • 4K 3840 x 2160 resolution
  • 32-inch panel
  • 16:9 aspect ratio
  • 60Hz refresh rate
  • HDR10 support
  • Included magnetic SlimFit webcam with face tracking
  • 400 nits brightness
  • 99% sRGB
  • 4ms response time
  • Built-in 2.2 channel speakers
  • Available in white, blue, green, and pink
  • Slim bezels and overall slim design
  • Doubles as a smart TV, with Apple TV+ built-in and AirPlay 2
  • Price: MSRP $699-$729 (usually goes for less)

The Smart Monitor M8 is available direct from Samsung and Amazon.

Best Thunderbolt Monitors for Mac wrap-up

Hopefully, now you understand the differences between USB-C and Thunderbolt monitors along with the top options on the market – particularly if you don’t want to spend several thousand dollars on Apple’s displays.

And if you’ve realized you’d rather spend somewhere between $200-600 on a monitor, check out our round-up of affordable USB-C displays:

  • Best USB-C and Thunderbolt displays for Mac

Thanks for reading our guide on the best Thunderbolt monitors for Mac!

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Best USB-C/Thunderbolt displays for MacBooks

USB-C/Thunderbolt display options have really expanded over the last couple of years. While Apple’s Pro Display XDR isn’t the best fit for most Mac users at $5,000+, it also offers the more affordable Studio Display. But there are also lots of solid choices from LG, Samsung, BenQ, and more. Let’s look at the best USB-C/Thunderbolt displays with many available in the $400-$1,600 range.

Update 5/12/23: Dell has launched its Apple Pro Display XDR competitor with the UltraSharp 32 6K Monitor. It undercuts Apple at $3,199 with a strong feature set. Check out all the details below.

And one more notable product on the way this year is Samsung’s first 5K monitor that will compete with Apple’s Studio Display. We’re still waiting on the launch and pricing details for that one.


Table of contents

  • Best USB-C/Thunderbolt displays for Mac: 32-inch and larger
    • LG 32UL950-W
    • LG 34BK95U-W
    • BenQ PD3220U
    • Dell UltraSharp 32 6K Monitor U3224KB
    • Dell UltraSharp 32 4K USB-C Hub Monitor (U3223QE)
    • LG UltraFine OLED Pro
  • Apple Studio Display and LG UltraFine displays
    • Studio Display
    • LG UltraFine 24 & 27-inch Displays
  • Best USB-C/Thunderbolt displays for Macs on a budget
    • BenQ 27- or 32-inch Ergo Arm 4K
    • Samsung 32-inch Smart Monitor M8
    • LG 32-inch Smart Monitor
    • Monoprice 32-inch CrystalPro 4K Monitor
    • LG 32-inch 32UP550-W
  • Holding Out?

All the displays below work with a single-cable setup with your MacBook Pro, MacBook Air, and even PCs. The iPad Pro and 2020 iPad Air and later can also be used with any of these USB-C/Thunderbolt displays but with limitations.

  • Related: Best monitor arms to bring flexibility to your Mac’s external display

Even though Apple’s 6K Pro Display XDR is a fantastic product (full review), the reality is that at $5,000+, it’s overkill for many MacBook owners’ needs, budgets, or both.

Fortunately, there are some solid 32-inch+ options from other companies in the $1,000 ballpark that offer a compelling experience. And we’ll also look at some 27-32-inch 4K USB-C displays in the $400-$800 range.

Best USB-C/Thunderbolt displays for Mac: 32-inch and larger

LG 32UL950-W

This is LG’s UltraFine 32-inch display that includes a solid feature set like two Thunderbolt 3 ports plus two USB-A ports, slim bezels, support for use in portrait orientation, and more.

In his full review, my colleague Jeff Benjamin found he liked the design better than LG’s other UltraFine models with many of the same features.

Specs:

  • 31.5-inch UHD 4K display (3840 x 2160)
  • 60Hz refresh rate
  • Nano IPS with DCI-P3 98%
  • 600 nits HDR peak brightness, 450 nits standard
  • VESA DisplayHDR™ 600
  • Dual Thunderbolt 3 ports (in x 1 (PD 60W) / out x 1)
  • 4K Daisy Chain with Thunderbolt™ 3
  • 2 x USB-A
  • DisplayPort 1.4
  • HDMI 2.0
  • 3.5mm headphone output
  • MSRP: $1,300, often available for less

The LG 32UL950-W can be found on Amazon as well as other retailers like B&H Photo.

LG 34BK95U-W

Moving up a couple of inches, LG’s 34-inch widescreen Thunderbolt 3/USB-C display offers a 5120 x 2160 resolution (in-between 4K and 5K). Jeff reviewed this display and found it to be a compelling option for creative pros.

But if you’re a creative professional who knows what you’re getting yourself into, this display is a significant real estate upgrade from 4K. Just make sure you understand that this is really a 4. 5K display, and it doesn’t offer any resolution advantages over a true 5K display like the one found in the 5K iMac or iMac Pro.

Specs:

  • Nano IPS (In-Plane Switching) Panel
  • Thunderbolt 3 Interface
  • Power output: 85W
  • 5120 x 2160 Resolution
  • 21:9 Aspect Ratio
  • 60Hz Refresh Rate
  • Brightness: 450 (Typ), 360 (min) cd/m2
  • Support for VESA HDR 600
  • DCI-P3 98%
  • 2 x HDMI
  • 1 x DisplayPort
  • 2 x USB 3.0
  • 3.5mm headphone input
  • Speakers: 5W x 2
  • Slim bezel design on all four sides
  • MSRP: $1,649, often available for less

The LG 34WK95U-W is usually in stock at Amazon and B&H Photo.

BenQ PD3220U

This is a nice alternative to the LG options above. The 32-inch BenQ PD3220U features Thunderbolt 3, 4K resolution, 95% DCI-P3 color, 85W power delivery for MacBooks, a variety of professional modes, hotkey puck, solid metal stand, and lots of I/O.

Specs:

  • 3840 x 2160 resolution
  • 16:9 aspect ratio
  • 60Hz refresh rate
  • Brightness: 250 typical, 300 nits HDR peak
  • 95% DCI-P3
  • HDR10
  • 1 x Thunderbolt 3 – 85W power delivery
  • 1 x Thunderbolt 3 – 15W power delivery
  • 2 x HDMI 2.0
  • 1 x DisplayPort 1.4
  • 3 x USB 3.1
  • 1 x USB C
  • 1 x USB B
  • Headphone jack
  • Slim bezels
  • MSRP: $1,199 often available for less

You can usually find the BenQ PD3220U at Amazon and BH Photo.

Dell UltraSharp 32 6K Monitor U3224KB

While it doesn’t match Apple’s Pro Display XDR feature for feature – and has a clunkier design – the 32-inch UltraSharp 6K has an impressive feature set with a list price of $3,199. That’s around 50% less than the Pro Display XDR (depending on configuration).

The UltraSharp 32 6K features IPS Black tech, 99% DCI-P3, a Thunderbolt 4 hub, 140W passthrough charging, a built-in 4K webcam, noise-canceling mics, and more. Here is the full spec list:

  • 31.5-inch 6K panel (6144 x 3456)
    • IPS Black technology
    • HDR 600 certified
    • 2000:1 contrast
    • 99% DCI-P3
    • 100% sRGB
  • Integrated 4K HDR CMOS webcam
    • Adjustable with 20-degree tilt
  • Dual 14W speakers
  • Dual noise-canceling mics
  • Thunderbolt 4/USB-C hub
    • 140W charging for laptops
    • 2x Thunderbolt 4 ports
    • 3x USB-C ports
    • 2x USB-A ports
    • HDMI 2.1
    • mini DisplayPort 2.1
    • 2.5Gb Ethernet port
    • Security lock slot
    • Pop-out front-facing ports include two USB-C and one USB-A
  • Connect two computer sources with picture-by-picture and picture-in-picture support
  • Compatible with Mac and Windows
  • Price: $3,199

You can pick up the Dell UltraSharp 32 6K Monitor direct from the company.

Dell UltraSharp 32 4K USB-C Hub Monitor (U3223QE)

Highlights for this Dell UltraSharp include 98% DCI-P3 color, 90W charging via USB-C for MacBooks, and a convenient integrated hub with USB-C, USB-A, Ethernet, DP 1. 4, and HDMI.

Specs:

  • 31.5-inch display with IPS Black technology
  • 4K 3840 x 2160 resolution
  • 60Hz refresh rate
  • 16:9 aspect ratio
  • 8ms response time
  • Anti-glare finish with 3H hard coating
  • Brightness: 400 nits
  • USB 3.2 gen 2 hub
    • HDMI (HDCP 2.2)
    • DisplayPort 1.4
    • DisplayPort output
    • USB-C upstream/DisplayPort 1.4 Alt Mode with Power Delivery (power up to 90W, HDCP 2.2)
    • USB-C 3.2 Gen 2 upstream
    • USB-C 3.2 Gen 2 downstream (power up to 15W)
    • 4 x USB 3.2 Gen 2 downstream
    • USB 3.2 Gen 2 downstream with Battery Charging 1.2
    • Audio line-out (mini-jack)
    • LAN (RJ-45 Ethernet)
  • MSRP: $1,150

The UltraSharp 32 4K USB-C Hub Monitor is available from Amazon and BH Photo.

Dell also makes more affordable UltraSharp models like the 27-inch size.

LG UltraFine OLED Pro

After starting to sell the 32-inch model priced at $3,999 last year, BH Photo later listed the 27-inch model at $2,999.

The move to OLED is interesting. While there are some benefits like blacker blacks, and more, there may be concerns about display burn-in.

BH Photo was the first retailer to sell the UltraFine OLED Pro with a $3,999 price tag (often available for less).

Specs:

  • 27 and 31.5-inch OLED screen options (27-inch still unavailable)
  • 3840 x 2160 4K resolution
  • 60Hz refresh rate
  • USB-C with 90W pass-thru power
  • up to 500 nits brightness
  • Dolby HDR 400 True Black
  • 1 ms response time
  • 10-bit color depth
  • 2 x DisplayPort
  • 3 x USB
  • 1 x HDMI
  • DCI P3 at 99%
  • Adobe RGB 99%

For a closer look, check out the first full review:

  • First LG UltraFine OLED Pro review calls the display ‘astonishing’ as launch appears imminent [Video]

Apple Studio Display and LG UltraFine displays

Studio Display

Apple’s Studio Display arrived alongside the new Mac Studio and marks the return to prosumer monitors after letting LG’s UltraFine series serve as its official recommendation since 2016.

Starting at $300 above the LG UltraFine 5K the Studio Display is aimed at those who value Apple’s refined (and metal) build quality.

Specs:

  • 27-inch panel
  • 5K 5120 x 2880 resolution
  • 16:9 aspect ratio
  • 218 PPI
  • 60Hz refresh rate
  • 600 nits brightness
  • P3 wide color support
  • True Tone support
  • 1 Thunderbolt 3 port with 96W power delivery plus 3 USB-C ports
  • Built-in 12 MP ultra wide camera with Center Stage support
  • 6-speaker system with Spatial Audio support
  • Studio-quality 3-mic array
  • Aluminum build
  • Supports most reference modes as Pro Display XDR except HDR
  • Price: $1599-$2,299 (depending on stand and screen finish)

Studio Display is available from Apple, Amazon, BH Photo, Best Buy, and more.

Check out our detailed comparison along with more perspective on the Studio Display:

  • Here’s how the new Apple Studio Display compares to the Pro Display XDR and LG UltraFine
  • In defense of the (unnecessarily controversial) Apple Studio Display

LG UltraFine 24 & 27-inch Displays

While the 27-inch UltraFine display (reviewed) is was really the only option on the market to support USB-C/Thunderbolt 3 at a full 5K resolution, the $1,300 price may make this a tough sell for some.

Another trade-off here is chunkier bezels for a built-in webcam. The current models are the 5K 27-inch and the 4K 24-inch UltraFine displays.

At almost half the price, the 24-inch 4K UltraFine is a compelling option for an Apple-endorsed display for those okay with the smaller size. The 24-inch version replaced the 21.5-inch 4K model in May 2019 and retails around $700. Check out our full review here.

Best USB-C/Thunderbolt displays for Macs on a budget

While there are some solid displays on the market that include USB-C with less than 4K resolutions, spending several hundred dollars on a new display with a lower picture quality than what you’re used to on your MacBook won’t be a good fit for many.

Here are some of the best USB-C displays that offer a 4K resolution at around $600 or less.

BenQ 27- or 32-inch Ergo Arm 4K

The new Ergo Arm 4K Designer Monitors from BenQ offer a strong feature set and specs with pricing ranging from $599-749.

Specs:

  • 27- or 32-inch panel at 4K resolution at 3840 x 2160 (anti-glare matte finish)
  • 16:9 aspect ratio
  • USB-C single cable connectivity with 90W power delivery (65W for PD2705UA)
    • 1 x USB-C input/output
    • 1 x USB-C output
    • 1x HDMI 2.0
    • 1x DisplayPort 1.4
    • 2x USB-B (USB 3.0 / 3.1/3.2 Gen 1) Input
    • 3x USB-A (USB 3.0 / 3.1/3.2 Gen 1) Output
    • 1x 3.5mm headphone jack
  • KVM switch to control two Macs or PCs with one keyboard/mouse
  • 250-350 nits brightness
  • 163 PPI
  • 60Hz refresh rate
  • HDR10
  • 95% DCI P3/99% sRGB
  • 178-degree viewing angle
  • 5 ms response time
  • 2x 2. 5W built-in speakers
  • Flexible Ergo Arm
  • Price: $599, $629, $749

The $599 PD2705UA has 65W power deliver instead of 90W like the PD2706UA and PD3205UA. Meanwhile, the PD2706UA is the only one of the three to offer DCI P3 support if that’s an important feature.

You can pick up the new BenQ Ergo Arm 4K Designer Monitors direct or from BH Photo. Check out our full review for all the fine details.

Samsung 32-inch Smart Monitor M8

The successor to last year’s M7, the Smart Monitor M8 offers a compelling package for those that want a 4K resolution, USB-C, and a large screen while spending well under $1,000. It even features a very iMac-like design and four color choices too.

Specs:

  • USB-C with up to 65W charging
  • 4K 3840 x 2160 resolution
  • 32-inch panel
  • 16:9 aspect ratio
  • 60Hz refresh rate
  • HDR10 support
  • Included magnetic SlimFit webcam with face tracking
  • 400 nits brightness
  • 99% sRGB
  • 4ms response time
  • Built-in 2. 2 channel speakers
  • Available in white, blue, green, and pink
  • Slim bezels and overall slim design
  • Doubles as a smart TV, with Apple TV+ built-in and AirPlay 2
  • Price: MSRP $699-$729, often available for less

The Smart Monitor M8 is available direct from Samsung and Amazon with the white version normally going for $699.99 and the colored variants selling for $729.99.

LG 32-inch Smart Monitor

Arriving as a competitor to Samsung’s Smart Monitor M8 above, the new LG Smart Monitor features a compelling list of specs and features for its $500 price.

  • USB-C with up to 65W charging
    • Also includes 2x HDMI, 1x USB-A, 1x Ethernet, and 3.5mm audio jack
  • 4K 3840 x 2160 resolution
  • 31.5-inch panel
  • 16:9 aspect ratio
  • 65Hz refresh rate
  • Clamp-style adjustable stand
  • 250 nits brightness
  • 90% DCI P3
  • 5ms response time
  • Doubles as smart TV, with LG’s webOS, AirPlay 2, and HomeKit
  • Price: MSRP $499. 99

You can find the LG Smart Monitor at Amazon, direct from LG, and soon at BH Photo.

Monoprice 32-inch CrystalPro 4K Monitor

This is a solid option if you’re looking to get a 4K resolution with USB-C connectivity but are okay to skip on the bells and whistles.

Specs:

  • 32-inch screen with 4K – 3840 x 2160 resolution
  • 1 x USB-C with 65W power delivery
  • 2 x HDMI 2.0
  • 1 x DisplayPort 1.2
  • 1 x headphone jack
  • 2 x USB-A ports
  • 16:9 aspect ratio
  • 60Hz refresh rate
  • 5ms response time
  • Fully articulating stand
  • MSRP: $399.99 (often available for less)

This 32-inch affordable 4K USB-C display from Monoprice is available on Amazon.

LG 32-inch 32UP550-W

This newer budget release from LG is a more compelling option than its older 27-inch 4K 27UK850. The 32UP550-W features a 32-inch screen, 4K resolution, USB-C, 96W power delivery, and more.

Specs:

  • 1 x USB-C with 96W power delivery
  • 2 x HDMI
  • 1 x DisplayPort
  • 2 x USB 3. 0
  • 1 x headphone jack
  • 16:9 aspect ratio
  • 60Hz refresh rate
  • Up to 350 nits brightness
  • 3840 x 2160 resolution
  • DCI-P3 at 90%
  • HDR10
  • Anti-glare finish
  • MSRP: $449 or less

This 32-inch affordable 4K USB-C display from LG is available to order on Amazon.

Holding Out?

Thinking of waiting? If you feel like you can’t compromise on a 4K resolution but are open to saving some cash by skipping the USB-C/Thunderbolt connectivity, Philips has a 27-inch 4K display for quite a bit less than the price of the other displays on this list. AOC also makes a comparable 27-inch 4K option.

Sidecar

Another option – make use of the great macOS Sidecar feature that lets you use an iPad as a secondary display.

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A programmer has found that his monitor frequently turns off due to an ungrounded IKEA Markus computer chair / Sudo Null IT News and man. It is noteworthy that the manufacturer does not warn that the office chair must be grounded before using it with a PC to avoid damage to the electronics.

German programmer Felix Hecker encountered a periodic shutdown of his working 4K monitor and found out that the power supplies, socket, video card, power cable, special software installed on the PC and video adapter drivers turned out to be nothing to do with it. The monitor continued to go out randomly and did not want to work properly.

Hecker persevered in his search for the cause of this unusual problem. Eventually, he realized that most of the time the monitor only turned off when he got up or sat down with Markus, even though the chair didn’t even touch his desk.

Hecker has found that there are no problems with the monitor when using a chair from another manufacturer. He changed back to Markus, the blackouts came back.

“My chair has an automatic screen on/off feature. I think this is a good privacy feature,” Hecker explained. He advised new Markus customers to make sure this IKEA chair is compatible with all of their PC components.

It turned out that the programmer is not the only one with electronics failures because of this very chair. Other users also experienced HDD problems due to Markus, and the Radeon RX 6800 XT started to crash and 2-3 monitors flickered at once.

“It’s completely reproducible. Shift against the backrest, rub back and forth a little on the seat, and then simply lean forward slightly or stand up from the chair. This will immediately cause a flicker on the monitor or even two or three, depending on how many you have on your desk, ”another Markus owner confirmed earlier.

Subject matter experts and affected users believe that the Markus chair can indeed build up and emit strong electrostatic charges through user interaction with fabric material, armrests, friction in the gas lift module for height adjustment, or a combination of these. elements.

There are several ways to avoid this problem with Markus. The main thing is the grounding of the chair, as well as the refusal to use sweaters and synthetic clothing at the workplace, maintaining the humidity level in the room above 40%, removing the charge by the user before sitting in the chair, for example, by touching the battery.

As a result, Hecker decided to think about how to make the grounding of his chair more correctly by analogy with the option shown in the photo below. But in addition to just the ground cable, in this case, you need to disassemble the lower part of the chair, add a sheet of copper foil from below, attach it with a construction stapler to the skin, and also solder the cable from this sheet to the metal elements of the back.

According to the IKEA website, the manufacturer gives a ten-year warranty on the Markus chair and does not warn about electrostatic discharge and the need to ground the chair. The chair does not include a ground cable or other materials to prevent the chair from building up static electricity.

The doctor told at what distance a computer monitor does not harm eyesight

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The doctor told at what distance a computer monitor does not harm eyesight

The doctor told at what distance a computer monitor does not harm eyesight – RIA Novosti, 01/25/2022

The doctor told at what distance a computer monitor does not harm eyesight

in this mode of operation, do not spoil your eyesight, you need to be 50-60 centimeters RIA Novosti, 01/25/2022 :11

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9 0002 MOSCOW, November 7 – RIA Novosti. On average, Russians spend at the computer from 6 to 7 hours a day – in order not to spoil your eyesight with this mode of operation, you need to be 50-60 centimeters from the monitor, the doctor of medical sciences, ophthalmologist, chief physician of Invitro- Moscow “Sergey Khomyakov. ” Place the computer monitor screen directly in front of you. The upper edge of the screen should be at the level of your line of sight. The distance from the eyes to the monitor should be about 50-60 centimeters. If you are working on a laptop or tablet with a screen diagonal of 10 -12 inches, then the distance can be equal to the Harmon distance – this is the distance from the elbow to the thumb, or an average of 40-45 centimeters,” Khomyakov explained. He noted that in recent years, much attention has been paid not to the level of lighting, which is normalized , namely the spectral composition of light. “Our organ of vision has evolved in the conditions of the natural spectrum of white light, which is formed after the passage of sunlight through the atmosphere. Accordingly, the most ergonomic light sources are as close as possible in the spectrum of the emitted light to the light flux of the natural spectrum. The indicator of light pulsation is no less important – it is necessary to choose lamps with zero pulsation – it is under such lighting that the eyes and the visual system as a whole are the least tired, “the doctor added. He clarified that, if we talk about artificial light sources, induction lamps meet these criteria , incandescent lamps and some modern LED lamps. The light source when working at a computer should be background, diffused. The light flux emitted by a 60-watt incandescent lamp or its modern equivalent is enough. This is about 600 lumens. “When reading and working for computer, the most important factor is the background from which the person is reading. The optimal background of a sheet of paper should be yellowish, have contrasting black letters with special “notches”. Today, people receive the overwhelming amount of information, including text, through monitor screens, the background color of which can be adjusted. Much depends on the time of day and the state of the optical media. For example, in the evening it is better to read in “warm” light, and patients with the onset of changes in the lens when reading will be more comfortable with colder light, which contains more short-wavelength blue rays,” Khomyakov concluded.

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Society, Technology, Health – Society

MOSCOW, November 7 – RIA Novosti. Russians spend an average of 6 to 7 hours a day at a computer – in order not to spoil their eyesight with this mode of operation, you need to be 50-60 centimeters from the monitor, the doctor of medical sciences, ophthalmologist, chief physician of Invitro told RIA Novosti -Moscow” Sergey Khomyakov.

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“Place the screen of the computer monitor directly in front of you. The top edge of the screen should be at the level of your line of sight. The distance from your eyes to the monitor should be about 50-60 centimeters. If you are working on a laptop or tablet with a screen diagonal of 10 -12 inches, then the distance can be equal to the Harmon distance – this is the distance from the elbow to the thumb, or an average of 40-45 centimeters,” Khomyakov explained.

He noted that in recent years much attention has been paid not to the level of illumination, which is normalized, but to the spectral composition of light.

“Our organ of vision has evolved in the conditions of the natural spectrum of white light, which is formed after the passage of sunlight through the atmosphere. Accordingly, the most ergonomic light sources are as close as possible in the spectrum of emitted light to the light flux of the natural spectrum. No less important is the indicator of light pulsation – it is necessary choose lamps with zero pulsation – it is under such lighting that the eyes and the visual system as a whole get the least tired,” the doctor added.

He clarified that in the case of artificial light sources, induction lamps, incandescent lamps and some modern LED lamps meet these criteria. The light source when working at a computer should be background, diffused. The luminous flux that a 60-watt incandescent lamp or its modern equivalent emits is quite enough. It’s about 600 lumens.

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“When reading and working at a computer, the most important factor is the background from which a person reads. The optimal background of a sheet of paper should be yellowish, have contrasting black letters with special “notches”. Today, the overwhelming amount of information, including text, is received through monitor screens, the background color of which can be adjusted. Much depends on the time of day and the state of optical media. For example, in the evening it is better to read in a “warm” light, and patients with changes in the lens that have begun to read will be more comfortable with colder light, which contains more short-water blue rays,” Khomyakov concluded.