Lemons in a juicer: Access to this page has been denied.

How to Juice a Lemon (6 Methods With + Without Juicer | + Freeze it)

How to juice a lemon with or without a juicer, using one of the 6 methods below! Including top tips to get every last drop and how to freeze lemon (juice, slices, and whole) for longer-term storage!

Whether you’re a big fan of lemonade or love to add lemon to brighten up the flavor of countless other meals, learning how to juice a lemon without a juicer is an essential life skill in my lemon-loving opinion. In fact, while I’ve included the juicer method below, I’ve included five other methods for you to choose from! As a bonus, many work with other citrus fruit, like limes, too!

Plus, with plenty of top tips, you’ll be able to get every last drop of juice and even use the leftover peel/pith! Best of all, I’ve included how to store lemons in the freezer: whole, sliced, or just the juice! To make the most of this zesty, healthful fruit!

Once juiced, you can use the fresh lemon juice to whip up large batches of homemade lemonade (including flavored mint lemonade, Brazilian cream lemonade, pineapple lemonade, etc. ). I also love using it for garlic lemon pasta, lemon garlic butter sauce, lemon chia Fresca, preserved lemons, etc.!

Table of contents

  • What’s Needed
  • Top Tips To Extract The Most Juice
  • How to Juice Lemons With and Without a Juicer?
    • With an Electric Juicer
    • Using a Handheld/Citrus Juicer
    • With a Fork or Spoon
    • Using a Stand Mixer
    • The Freezer Method
    • Without Cutting the Lemon
  • How Much Lemon Juice Is In One Lemon?
  • How To Store and Freeze?
  • How to Use Lemon Pith/Peel?
  • Other Juice Recipes

What’s Needed

  • Lemons: use whatever lemons you have to hand, though Meyer lemons are a super juicy, slightly sweeter variety I love for lemonade, etc. It’s best to use organic, unwaxed lemons wherever possible, especially when you plan to consume the zest.

You will also need:

  • To juice: once again, there are several tools you’re able to use for this. Including an electric juicer, manual lemon squeezer/citrus reamer, a fork/spoon, stand mixer, microwave, or a simple skewer!
  • To zest: you can use several tools, including a cheese grater or simply a sharp paring knife. Check my blog post How to Zest Lemon for all the tips!

While this is optional, I highly recommend zesting/peeling the lemon before juicing it to make the most of the ingredient.

For any method that slices the lemons, you’ll also need a cutting board and sharp knife.

  • Zest it first: even if you have no immediate use for it, it’s always best to zest/peel the lemons before juicing (it’s easier to do it in this order). As a bonus, the fruit is even easier to squeeze without the peel!
  • Work with room temperature lemons: this helps soften the interior for easier squeezing.
  • Microwave it: microwaving your lemon/s (whole) for just 15-25 seconds will help loosen the membranes and juice within and soften the lemon (which makes them easier to squeeze). I usually follow up this step with the next one (rolling).

Alternatively, you can place the lemons in a bowl of hot water for a couple of minutes until the skin is warm.

  • Roll it: I always do this before juicing a lemon. Simply roll it on your countertop back and forth several times to help break up and squeeze some of the membranes and get the juice loose and ready to squeeze!
  • Cut lengthwise: unless you’re using an electric/manual juicer fit for widthwise lemon halves, many methods will benefit from the lemons being cut lengthwise instead, as there’s more open flesh to juice.

How to Juice Lemons With and Without a Juicer?

With an Electric Juicer

This method is the easiest of the bunch and is practically effortless! If you’re someone who makes a lot of lemonade (or other recipes where large quantities of fresh lemon juice are required), then it may be worth investing in.

However, note that some people believe hand-squeezed lemon juice is superior as there’s less risk of bitterness from the pith ending up in the juice and usually more oils from the peel.

  1. Simply slice the lemons in half and press each half against the electric juicer until fully juiced.

The machine will naturally strain the pulp and seeds, so the juice is immediately ready to use (or freeze).

Using a Handheld/Citrus Juicer

A manual juicer is an option many of us have, which can be the same shape as an electric one, but we need to put in the arm work to get those lemons juiced!

  1. First, use the methods mentioned in the tips section above – microwave (for 20-30 seconds) and/or roll the lemon (on the countertop, back and forth) to loosen up and soften the lemon as much as possible.
  2. Then, cut the lemon/s in half, place the center of each half over the reamer or the juicer, and press, squeeze and twist the lemon until all the juice is extracted.

Some manual juicers are tabletop versions that still automatically strain the seeds/pulp from the juice. Others, like the handheld “reamer” photographed, do not. When using the latter, you could place a strainer over the jug/bowl you’re juicing the lemons over. That way, you don’t need to strain it afterward .

With a Fork or Spoon

For those who have no particular tool, did you know that you can juice lemons with a spoon or fork? Here’s how:

  1. First, use the methods mentioned in the tips section above – microwave (for 20-30 seconds) and/or roll the lemon (on the countertop, back and forth) to loosen up and soften the lemon as much as possible.

I always do this for the tool-free option, as it really helps to make the job easier and extract as much juice as possible from the lemons.

  1. Then, chop the lemon in half and place it over your bowl/container of choice (placing a fine-mesh sieve over that will help strain the pulp and seeds).
  2. Pressing a spoon or fork into the center of each half, squeeze and twist. The spoon or fork will work similarly to the handheld reamer and will crush the remaining membranes inside and release the juice.

Using a Stand Mixer

Okay, I’ll admit, this method was odd even for me. But when I tried it and it actually worked… Who knew?! While it’s usually my last resort (more cleanup and mess!), the fact that more of the skin oils are infused into the juice makes it extra zippy!

  1. First, slice the lemon/s in quarter lengthwise wedges and place them in the bowl of your stand mixer.
  2. Then, cover the bowl with a layer of plastic wrap (or use a splatter guard) and turn the mixer on low, allowing it to squeeze and crush lemons until they look thoroughly juiced.
  3. Then, pour the juice through a strainer.

The Freezer Method

While this isn’t an option I use often, it can help with hard, dry lemons.

  1. Simply pop the lemon in the freezer. Then, when needed, allow it to thaw entirely at room temperature before juicing with your method of choice.

Alternatively, you can thaw the lemons in a cold water bath (for around 20 minutes) or even in the microwave.

How does this work? The freezing/thawing process breaks the membranes within the lemon as they expand upon freezing and makes it super juicy once thawed, so it’s easier to extract the juice manually (with a fork/spoon or simply by hand).

Without Cutting the Lemon

This “hack” went viral online in the last year or two, with mixed reactions. I don’t think it’s the most efficient way to juice a lemon, but it works when following the correct steps.

This method is best when you need a small amount of juice, and you can then save the leftover lemon without as much risk of it drying out. Plus, it’s mess-free, with no need for knives, chopping boards, etc.

  1. First, use the methods mentioned in tips section above – microwave (for 20-30 seconds) and/or roll the lemon (on the countertop, back and forth) to loosen up and soften the lemon as much as possible. This will make it easier to squeeze.
  2. Then, using a skewer, chopstick, or thick toothpick, pierce the non-stem end of the lemon. Press it as far into the lemon as you can without going all the way through.
  3. Then, hold the lemon over your container (optionally place a strainer first, though this method shouldn’t allow much pulp/seeds to escape the lemon) and squeeze. The juice should stream out through the hole.

How Much Lemon Juice Is In One Lemon?

This will depend on the size of the lemon. A medium-sized lemon usually provides around 3 tablespoons of juice. A large lemon will usually yield about 4 tablespoons of fresh lemon juice.

How To Store and Freeze?

To store in the refrigerator: fresh lemon juice will last 2-3 days in an airtight container in the refrigerator. However, it tends to get more bitter as it sits, so it’s best to freeze it for long-term storage.

How to freeze juice: there are two ways to freeze the fresh lemon juice that I use. The first option pours it into a jar with ½-inch of headspace. The second option portions the juice into an ice cube tray. Freeze until solid, then transfer the lemon ice cubes to an airtight container/reusable Ziplock bag for between 3-4 months.

As a bonus, lemon ice cubes can be added directly to lemonade and other drinks to chill without diluting them!

Lemon slices: while you can freeze them whole, I prefer to rinse, dry, and make thin slices. Arrange them on a parchment or plastic-lined baking tray and freeze until solid. Then transfer to a reusable Ziplock bag and freeze for 3-4 months. These slices are perfect for adding to drinks as a garnish and will release their juice as they thaw.

Alternatively, you can freeze the lemons whole!

How to Use Lemon Pith/Peel?

If you didn’t zest/peel the lemon/s before juicing (that way, it can be candied, added to baked recipes, marinades, sauces, etc.), there are still several ways to avoid wasting this zesty ingredient, including:

  • Preserve them: make preserved lemons by combining some juice with the peels and PLENTY of salt. Check my post for the full method! Or make candied rinds following this method.
  • Make an allpurpose cleaner: I’ve shared how to do this with orange peels, but it will also work with lemon (or a combination).
  • Use for other cleaning: you can use lemon peels for cleaning and adding a fresh fragrance to homemade cleaning. For example, when cleaning your microwave or oven.
  • For deodorizing: such as in your sink disposal or your bin (place the peel minus the pith under your garbage bag in the bin).
  • Compost them: while they take a while to break down, they ARE compostable. I recommend slicing them into tiny pieces first, though.
  • Dehydrate them: slice the leftover rinds and then use a paring knife to peel them, leaving the pith behind. You can then dehydrate the peel/lemon zest on a drying rack or dehydrator/oven. Once dry, add to tea, potpourri, make lemon pepper, etc.

Other Juice Recipes

  • Apple Juice
  • Orange Juice
  • Watermelon Juice (4 methods)
  • Tomato Juice (3 methods)
  • Cucumber Juice (3 methods)
  • Kiwi Juice
  • Carrot Juice
  • Peach Juice (Peach Nectar | 2 Methods)

If you try one of these methods for how to juice a lemon, I’d love to hear your thoughts/questions below. Also, I’d appreciate a recipe card rating below, and feel free to tag me in your recipe recreations on Instagram @Alphafoodie!

  • ▢ 1 lemon or as many as needed
1 medium lemon will yield about 3 Tbsp/45 ml.
    • Juicer (use code ALPHAFOODIE) – OR –

    • Citrus juicer

    With an Electric Juicer
    Using a Citrus Juicer or a Handheld Reamer
    • Use the methods mentioned in the Notes section below – microwave (for 20-30 seconds) and/or roll the lemon (on the countertop, back and forth) to loosen up and soften the lemon as much as possible.

    • Cut the lemon/s in half, place the center of each half over the reamer or the juicer, and press, squeeze and twist the lemon until all the juice is extracted.

      Some manual juicers are tabletop versions that still automatically strain the seeds/pulp from the juice. Others, like the handheld “reamer” photographed, do not. When using the latter, you could place a strainer over the jug/bowl you’re juicing the lemons over. That way, you don’t need to separately strain it through a juicer afterward.

    With a Fork or Spoon
    • Use the methods mentioned in the Notes section below – microwave (for 20-30 seconds) and/or roll the lemon (on the countertop, back and forth) to loosen up and soften the lemon as much as possible.

    • Cut the lemon in half and place it over your bowl/container of choice (placing a fine-mesh sieve over that will help strain the pulp and seeds).

    • Pressing a spoon or fork into the center of each half, squeeze and twist. The spoon or fork will work similarly to the handheld reamer and will crush the remaining membranes inside and release the juice.

    Using a Stand Mixer
    • Slice the lemon/s in quarter lengthwise wedges and place them in the bowl of your stand mixer.

    • Cover the bowl with a layer of plastic wrap (or use a splatter guard) and turn the mixer on low, allowing it to squeeze and crush lemons until they look thoroughly juiced.

    • Pour the juice through a strainer, giving each lemon half one more last squeeze manually.

    The Freezer Method
    Without Cutting the Lemon
    • Use the methods mentioned in the Notes section below – microwave (for 20-30 seconds) and/or roll the lemon (on the countertop, back and forth) to loosen up and soften the lemon as much as possible. This will make it much easier to squeeze.

    • Using a skewer, chopstick, or thick toothpick, pierce the non-stem end of the lemon. Press it as far into the lemon as you can without going all the way through.

    • Hold the lemon over your container (optionally place a strainer first, though this method shouldn’t allow much pulp/seeds to escape the lemon) and squeeze. The juice should stream out through the hole.

    How To Store and Freeze?
    • To store in the refrigerator: fresh lemon juice will last 2-3 days in an airtight container in the refrigerator. However, it tends to get more bitter as it sits, so it’s best to freeze it for long-term storage.

      How to freeze juice: there are two ways to freeze the fresh lemon juice that I use. The first option pours it into a jar with ½-inch of headspace. The second option portions the juice into an ice cube tray. Freeze until solid, then transfer the lemon ice cubes to an airtight container/Ziplock bag for 3-4 months.

      As a bonus, lemon ice cubes can be added directly to lemonade and other drinks to chill without diluting them!

      Lemon slices: while you can freeze them whole, I prefer to rinse, dry, and make thin slices. Arrange them on a parchment or plastic-lined baking tray and freeze until solid. Then transfer to a reusable Ziplock bag and freeze for 3-4 months. These slices are perfect for adding to drinks as a garnish and will release their juice as they thaw.

    Top Tips To Extract The Most Juice:

    • Zest it first: even if you have no immediate use for it, it’s always best to zest/peel the lemons before juicing (it’s easier to do it in this order). As a bonus, the fruit is even easier to squeeze without the peel!
    • Work with room temperature lemons: this helps soften the interior for easier squeezing.
    • Microwave it: microwaving your lemon/s (whole) for just 15-25 seconds will help loosen the membranes and juice within and soften the lemon (which makes them easier to squeeze). I usually follow up this step with the next one (rolling). Alternatively, you can place the lemons in a bowl of hot water for a couple of minutes until the skin is warm.
    • Roll it: I always do this before juicing a lemon. Simply roll it on your countertop back and forth several times to help break up and squeeze some of the membranes and get the juice loose and ready to squeeze!
    • Cut lengthwise: unless you’re using an electric/manual juicer fit for widthwise lemon halves, many methods will benefit from the lemons being but lengthwise instead, as there’s more open flesh to juice.

     

    Check the blog post for more helpful tips and answers to top FAQs!

    Serving: 1tablespoon | Calories: 10kcal | Carbohydrates: 3g | Protein: 1g | Fat: 1g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 1g | Monounsaturated Fat: 1g | Sodium: 1mg | Potassium: 50mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 1g | Vitamin A: 8IU | Vitamin C: 19mg | Calcium: 9mg | Iron: 1mg

    Tried this Recipe? Tag me Today!Mention @Alphafoodie or tag #alphafoodie!

    How to Juice a Lemon by Hand Easy

    Home › Wellness › Kitchen › How to Juice a Lemon

    33 Comments

    614
    shares

    I love cooking with fresh ingredients, and one of my favorites is fresh squeezed lemon juice. There is little you could do to convince me to purchase lemon juice at the store. The thought of acidic lemon juice swimming around in (and eating away at) a plastic bottle does not make me do a happy dance. But then again, I’m not a fan of plastic. I’ve been using glass since I set up house with my husband in the 1990’s. Back then people used to walk into my kitchen and ask, “what are all those jars for?!”

    For more on my preference for glass, and disdain of plastic, check out my collection of mason jars to the left (they have their own special cabinet in my kitchen) and read my Why Glass post.

    Fresh lemon juice is fantastic because it is both more flavorful and more nutritious than store bought lemon juice. Lemon juice is full of vitamin C, most of us know that. Did you know that lemon juice is also very alkaline and can help to balance your pH and prevent kidney stones? Lemon juice is also a great remedy for a sore throat –usually I drink my lemon juice in hot water when I have a tickle in my throat or feel a sniffle creeping up on me.

    Lemons are full of potassium and a great source of thiamin, riboflavin, iron, and magnesium. Further, lemons are a great addition to a Low Carb diet. They provide a burst of fruit flavor without sugar or much carbohydrate load.

    So, wondering how to juice a lemon? My favorite way is with the hand-held juicing tool above. First, I roll the lemons against the counter to soften them up, then I cut them in half, and cut the ends off of each lemon. Next, I place half of the lemon in the juicing tool and squeeze it as hard as I can. I find I get a great yield from my lemons when I follow these steps. The lemon juice that I squeeze usually lasts around 5 days or so in the refrigerator. It keeps its flavor well, probably because it is so acidic. When it does start to turn the juice will take on an unpleasant, bitter flavor.

    How to Juice a Lemon

    Print Email Pin Recipe

    • 6 lemons
    • Roll each lemon against the counter, pressing down with the palm of your hand

    • Cut lemons in half, then cut off both ends

    • Place half of a lemon at a time in the lemon juicer and squeeze

    • Refrigerate lemon juice in a glass pint mason jar

    Tried this recipe?Mention @elanaspantry or tag #elanaspantry!

    On Sundays, when I do my batch cooking for the week, I squeeze half a dozen lemons and store the freshly squeezed lemon juice in the refrigerator, so that I have it on hand for cooking. Sometimes, I like to add a tablespoon or so of lemon juice to a glass of water, along with a couple of drops of stevia, for an instant homemade lemonade. When I Start the Day with Hot Water and Lemon, I spare my fresh squeezed lemon juice and use a freshly chopped slice in a mug of boiling water. I’ve been doing that for years, and love it.

    Get My Keto Recipes eBook

    Free exclusive eBook, plus recipes and health tips, delivered to your inbox.

    What’s your favorite way to juice a lemon? Leave a comment and let us know if you have any tips and tricks to make the process even easier!

    Hi! I’m Elana:

    • Wellness Warrior
    • Food Fanatic
    • Paleo Pioneer

    About Me

    Check Out My Books!

    Buy Now

    Buy Now

    Buy Now

    Hungry for more?

    Get my favorite recipes and health tips delivered to your inbox each week

    Reader Interactions

    news, lemon, juice, cooking, secret, cooking

    News / cooking

    Belnovosti

    06/08/2022 08:46

    belnovosti. [email protected]

    Lemon juice is an essential ingredient in many dishes.

    The sour dressing is essential for sauces in a variety of salads, it is added to hot dishes with beetroot so that they do not lose their color, and it is a must-have in a fish marinade.

    The liquid extracted from the fruit is also used to clean various kitchen surfaces.

    And, of course, it’s no secret that it’s best to use freshly squeezed lemon juice.

    Photo: © Belnovosti

    However, not everyone, even the most dexterous housewives, has enough strength to easily squeeze out all the liquid contained in the fetus.

    As experience shows, ingenuity will help more than physical abilities in this matter.

    To get as much juice out of a lemon as possible, first mash it well. To do this, roll the fruit on a flat surface – on a table or cutting board.

    Then cut the lemon in half and apply the most important trick – use kitchen tongs instead of hand strength.

    Grasp half of the fruit with tongs and easily squeeze out all the juice to the last drop.

    Author: Elena Shimanovskaya

    • lemon
    • juice
    • cooking
    • secret

    Latest news

    Economy

    07/15/2023

    “Gullible Pinocchio” ran to change dollars: the fate is already determined

    Garden and Garden

    the harvest will double

    Society

    15.07. 2023

    What will happen on July 17, 2023: three predictors at once called this date

    Minsk

    07/15/2023

    ordinary matches will help pepper and tomatoes on the bush: for what they are needed – every summer resident 9 dreams about this0058

    Breaking news

    Incidents

    07/15/2023

    FSB prevented the murders of Sobchak and Simonyan

    Diets

    07/15/2023 90 003

    Foods that absolutely cannot be combined with eggs: many people make these mistakes

    Children

    15. 07.2023

    Signs of a toxic grandmother: not everyone knows about it

    Politics

    0058

    News today

    07/15/2023

    Named a dish that has everything for the growth of cancer: what should be excluded from the diet In the US, they learned what other cities in Ukraine will be liberated by Russia

    07/15/2023

    In the US, Zelensky’s lie about the Armed Forces of Ukraine was revealed

    07/15/2023

    All news

    How to squeeze lemon juice without a juicer

    Home » Useful tips

    Freshly squeezed lemon juice is included in various recipes. It is used in the preparation of homemade mayonnaise, for salad dressings, they are sprinkled with chopped fruit for smoothies or jams from browning. In most cases, you need very little, so it’s easy to squeeze the juice out of a lemon even without a juicer.

    Contents

    1. Preparatory steps
    2. By hand
    3. With tongs
    4. With a fork
    5. If only a little juice is needed
    6. 90 144

      Preparatory steps

      Juicy, thin-skinned varieties are best for pressing. But you can get fresh lemon juice even from a thick-skinned fruit. The main thing is to prepare it well – heat it up. Then the peel will become soft, the internal partitions, partially destroyed, will give the contents well. You can heat up in different ways:

      • At room temperature. Before using the lemon, you must first take it out of the refrigerator and let it warm up naturally. In summer, to speed up the process, it can be placed on a sunny windowsill, and in winter – by a hot battery. And after a good stretch with your hands or roll on the countertop, slightly pressing on the fruit with your palm.
      • microwave oven. Whole citrus, without cutting, send to the microwave for 30 seconds.
      • Hot water. It is enough for a lemon to lie in 50-degree water for about a minute, and it will not be difficult to squeeze the liquid out of it.

      Before the fruit is heated, it can be pre-frozen (but not necessary). When frozen, the liquid expands, rupturing cell membranes, so once the fruit has thawed, the juice will flow freely.

      Manual

      After the preparatory steps, it remains only to squeeze the juice in one of the ways.

      • Cut the lemon, pierce each half several times with a sharp object (fork, knife, toothpick) and manually squeeze out the contents. As practice shows, the juice gives the fruit better, cut along, and not across.
      • Through gauze. The fruit, previously peeled and white layer, divided into slices, cut into small pieces, remove the bones. Squeeze the pulp through multi-layer gauze.

      Freshly squeezed lemon juice can be used to make cucumber or apple lemonade.

      Tongs

      If your kitchen has metal tongs (not plastic ones), they can also be used to extract juice. Cut the preheated and mashed lemon in half. Place one part between the clamps of the tongs, and squeeze them, substituting a container for the flowing juice. Repeat the action with the other half.

      The method is convenient in that in this case much less force will have to be applied than with full manual extrusion. And your hands will stay clean.

      Using a fork

      Cut prepared fruit (warmed, mashed) in half. Holding a lemon half in one hand and a fork in the other, stick it into the pulp and gently twist it over the substituted container. Do the same with the other part.

      Regardless of which method is chosen, it is recommended that the resulting liquid be filtered. A sieve or plain gauze will help to rid the finished product of seeds and pulp.

      Without fresh lemon juice, you can’t make a tasty, refreshing ginger ale (non-alcoholic).

      If only a little juice is needed

      Sometimes a recipe calls for just a few drops of lemon. It is not necessary to spoil a whole fruit for the sake of a teaspoon of liquid.