Easyoven: EasyOven Heat Retention Oven – Blue – Biome

Easy Oven Egg Bite Recipe

By

Diana Rattray

Diana Rattray

Southern-cuisine expert and cookbook author Diana Rattray has created more than 5,000 recipes and articles in her 20 years as a food writer.

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Updated on 12/21/22

Tested by

Laurel Randolph

Tested by
Laurel Randolph

A fervid lover of the culinary arts and all things Instant Pot, Laurel has been writing about food for 10 years. One of her cookbooks was the #2 cookbook of 2017.

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Editorial Process

The Spruce Eats / Diana Chistruga

These protein-packed little egg bites are an excellent way to ensure everyone has a decent breakfast. They are effortless to prepare and bake, and you don’t need a sous vide appliance or Instant Pot to make these egg bites. Plus, when you bake them in the oven, you don’t have to wait for a tub of water to heat or pressure to build in a pressure cooker.

Use the time while the oven pre-heats to prep your veggies and other mix-ins. Or, you can chop and refrigerate the vegetables the night before. With a bit of advance prep, all you’ll have to do is mix the ingredients, fill the muffin tin, and bake!

This version contains a variety of tender, raw vegetables, but egg bites are easily modified to include your family’s favorite ingredients. Leave them meatless and use raw tender vegetables or add some cooked crumbled bacon or sautéed diced ham or sausage. Sautéed mushrooms are another excellent choice. Enjoy egg bites for breakfast or lunch, or serve them as a brunch dish.

“These flavorful little egg bites are like mini frittatas. They’re tasty served with toast and bacon, or stick one in between a toasted English muffin and call it a breakfast sandwich. If you have any trouble removing your bites from the muffin tin, run a sharp knife around the edge first.” —Laurel Randolph

  • Cooking spray

  • 8 large eggs

  • 1 cup shredded cheddar cheese

  • 1/3 cup half-and-half, or whole milk

  • 1/4 teaspoon salt

  • 1 dash freshly ground black pepper

  • 1 pinch nutmeg, optional

  • 2/3 cup diced tomatoes

  • 1/2 cup coarsely chopped packed baby spinach

  • 1/3 cup thinly sliced green onions

  1. Gather the ingredients. Position a rack in the center of the oven and heat to 350 F.

    The Spruce Eats / Diana Chistruga

  2. Spray a 12-well muffin tin with cooking spray.

    The Spruce Eats / Diana Chistruga

  3. In a large bowl, whisk the eggs with the shredded cheese, half-and-half, salt, pepper, and nutmeg, if using, until combined.

    The Spruce Eats / Diana Chistruga

  4. Add the diced tomatoes, spinach, and green onions; stir to combine.

    The Spruce Eats / Diana Chistruga

  5. Divide the mixture evenly among the muffin cups, about 1/4 cup in each cup.

    The Spruce Eats / Diana Chistruga

  6. Bake until they are set, puffed, and light golden, 15 to 18 minutes (they will deflate once removed from the oven).

    The Spruce Eats / Diana Chistruga

Recipe Variations

  • Quiche Lorraine-Style Egg Bites: Omit the tomatoes and spinach. Replace the cheddar with 3/4 cup of finely shredded Gruyére cheese and 1/4 cup of Parmesan cheese and add 1/2 cup of cooked diced bacon (about 6 to 8 strips of bacon), 1/3 cup of sliced green onions, and a dash of nutmeg.
  • Broccoli-Ham Egg Bites: Replace the tomatoes, spinach, and green onions with 1/2 cup of cooked diced ham and 1 1/2 cups of chopped broccoli that has been steamed until tender and cooled.

How to Store and Freeze

  • Refrigerate cooled egg bites in a covered container within 2 hours and eat within 4 days.
  • To freeze any remaining egg bites, arrange them on a baking sheet. Place the baking sheet in the freezer until solid, about 1 to 2 hours. Place the frozen egg bites in a zip-close freezer bag and freeze for up to 2 months. Thaw the egg bites in the refrigerator overnight.
  • Reheat egg bites in the microwave for 20 to 30 seconds, or place them in a baking dish and heat them in a preheated 350 F oven or toaster oven for about 10 minutes.

Why are my egg bites rubbery?

Eggs become tough and rubbery when overcooked. Bake just until cooked through and set and reheat just until warm to keep them tender.

34 Back-to-School Breakfast Recipes and Ideas

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Easy Oven-Cooked Pulled Pork Recipe

Oven-cooked pulled pork has all the flavor, with a fraction of the effort. Set it in the oven, and forget about it for hours until the perfectly tender pork is done.

By

J. Kenji López-Alt

J. Kenji López-Alt

Culinary Consultant

Kenji is the former culinary director for Serious Eats and a current culinary consultant for the site. He is also a New York Times food columnist and the author of The Food Lab: Better Home Cooking Through Science.

Learn about Serious Eats’
Editorial Process

Updated Sep. 15, 2022

Moist and flavor-packed pulled pork from the oven. .

Serious Eats / J. Kenji López-Alt

In This Recipe

  • Use a Dutch Oven for the Best Pulled Pork

  • Tips for Better Barbecue Sauce

  • How to Get the Best Pulled Pork Texture

Why This Recipe Works

  • Homemade barbecue sauce has better flavor than bottled versions.
  • Cooking pork in a Dutch oven allows the meat to slowly get tender, while developing a bark-like crust on top.
  • Adding only half of the barbecue sauce at the beginning keeps the pork from coming out too wet.

The easiest way I know of to ruffle the feathers of food-minded folks mounted atop high horses is to refer to some sort of vegetable preparation as “bacon.” Second is to speak ill of a regional specialty that ought to stay regional (here’s lookin’ at you, cheesesteaks).

Coming in a close third? Suggesting that a pulled pork recipe include any method other than low and slow in a smoke-filled barbecue.

I used to count myself among those rankled by that third one. My experience with indoor pulled pork was limited to the extra-wet and extra-sweet variety, braised in a slow cooker like a beer-bellied vacationer who accidentally fell asleep in a hot tub of bottled barbecue sauce. How could it ever compare to the tender and moist—but never wet—texture of real barbecue with a dark crust, a rich, smoky flavor, and a lovingly crafted sauce?

Easy: It can’t compare, and it shouldn’t. Just as it’s perfectly possible to love both grilled steaks and pan-seared steaks, or grilled burgers and burgers smashed on a griddle, it’s okay to enjoy pork shoulder cooked both outdoors and in. The two dishes are similar but completely different foods that can both be appreciated on their own merits.

But, just as there are great burgers and poor, not all indoor pulled pork is created equal. My goal with this recipe was to come up with a technique to produce pulled pork that shreds into large, tender chunks that are moist but not wet, with a flavor that balances sweet molasses, bright vinegar, heat, and just a hint of smoke. Oh, and I wanted it to be darn easy.

Use a Dutch Oven for the Best Pulled Pork

Most simple pulled pork recipes involve dumping a pork shoulder into a slow cooker, adding some bottled barbecue sauce and stock, and letting it cook until the pork falls apart. There were two simple and obvious upgrades that could be made to this method.

“I’ll trade the convenience of countertop cooking for more flavor any day”

First was to use a Dutch oven placed in the oven instead of a slow cooker, which only heats from the bottom and cooks by simmering and steaming. A Dutch oven in the oven heats from all sides, allowing browning to occur on the surface and around the edges of the pot, leading to far superior flavor. I’ll trade the convenience of countertop cooking for more flavor any day, and besides, as long as you’re hanging around the house (or are comfortable leaving the oven on), the convenience factor is more or less equal.

Tips for Better Barbecue Sauce

The second step was to ditch the bottled sauce and mix up a quick homemade barbecue sauce: dark molasses, ketchup, Worcestershire sauce, mustard, cider vinegar, hot sauce, and a spice blend consisting of black pepper, cayenne pepper, coriander, cumin, paprika, brown sugar, and salt. Seeing as I was already mixing up a spice blend for my barbecue sauce, I let the same blend perform double duty as a dry rub for my pork shoulder.

The browning I was getting around the edges of the Dutch oven was better than nothing, but giving the shoulder a sear at the start of cooking boosted flavor even more. (It goes fast because of the extra sugar in the spice rub.) I also sautéed an onion in the browned bits left behind by the pork.

On a whim, I decided to grab a bottle of bourbon from my liquor cabinet and dump some into the pot. First, I made sure to do this with the burner off in order to prevent accidentally setting it on fire and losing an eyebrow, then I carefully ignited the booze with a long lighter, letting it flambé until the flames died down. It was a good whim to follow, adding complexity to the finished sauce.

(Plus, flambéing gives you an excuse to both play with fire and take a sip of booze while you work. Double win.)

The next issue was sauce quantity. Some recipes call for as much as a full quart of liquid in the pot, perhaps based on the idea that more moisture to start will lead to moister pork in the end. But, as my Ultra-Crisp-Skinned Slow-Roasted Pork Shoulder recipe proves, it’s perfectly possible to get supremely moist pork with no added liquid at all. Adding excess sauce during cooking is the prime culprit in the wet-pork issue. We’re after pulled pork, not ragù.

The other interesting factor I noted was that no matter how bright and flavorful my sauce was to begin with, it would lose brightness over the course of cooking. Sure, it picked up some great pork flavor, but the tanginess was gone. I could fix both of these problems with one simple solution: Don’t add the sauce all at once.

By starting with half the sauce and a small amount of chicken stock, then adding the remaining half after shredding the pork, I ended up with pork that had better texture and sauce that had brighter flavor. A small splash of good-quality liquid smoke (I like Wright’s brand because it contains nothing but real smoke and water) simulates that true smoked flavor.

By the way, just as it’s possible to overcook beef in a beef stew, it’s quite possible to overcook pulled pork. You want your pork to be pull-apart tender—an indication that the connective tissue has broken down—but not so cooked that the muscle fibers themselves start to lose structure and turn to mush.

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As soon as the pork pulls apart in easy chunks, you’re done.

How to Get the Best Pulled Pork Texture

I’d nailed the moistness of the pork and the flavor of the sauce, but there was still a little something lacking: texture. Whether indoors or out, I like my pulled pork to have a combination of moist meat and crunchy bark. This was another easy fix: orienting the pork fat (or skin) side up and taking the lid off of the Dutch oven for the last hour of cooking allowed the exposed surface of the pork to brown and crisp into a dark bark.

Subsequently shredding the pork and mixing the bark in gave me the texture I was looking for.

At this stage, you could take this pork in any direction you like. Mix it with a vinegary, Eastern North Carolina–style barbecue sauce, shred it and stuff it into tacos with salsa, or maybe go with a mustard-style sauce.

In this case, I stuck with the sweet and tangy, Kansas City–style sauce I’d already started with.

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After skimming excess fat off the surface of the liquid in the Dutch oven and adding the rest of my barbecue sauce and a splash of vinegar to the pot, I folded in the pork.

Despite giving away mountains of pulled pork to neighbors, my wife and I and the dogs were on a steady pulled pork sandwich diet for over a week, which helped me make one last observation: From the moment you mix the shredded pork with the sauce, the pulled pork is on a steady decline. At first, it tastes as it should: moist pork, flavored with a tangy barbecue sauce. After it rests in the sauce and gets reheated the next day, it resembles that wet, ragù-style pulled pork I’m used to seeing in slow cookers. The flavor is there, but the texture starts to suffer.

My advice? Keep the sauce and the pulled pork separate, dressing only what you’ll eat in one go. (For some of you out there, that may be all of it.)

How to Make Easy Oven-Cooked Pulled Pork

February 2016

Easy Oven-Cooked Pulled Pork Recipe

Prep
15 mins

Cook
5 hrs 15 mins

Active
30 mins

Total
5 hrs 30 mins

Serves
8
to 12 servings

Oven-cooked pulled pork has all the flavor, with a fraction of the effort. Set it in the oven, and forget about it for hours until the perfectly tender pork is done.

  • 5 tablespoons dark brown sugar (2 1/4 ounces; 65g)

  • 1 tablespoon (about 9g) Diamond Crystal kosher salt; for table salt use half as much by volume or the same weight

  • 1 tablespoon paprika

  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin

  • 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

  • 1 teaspoon ground coriander

  • 1/2 teaspoon ground fennel seed

  • Large pinch cayenne pepper

  • 1 whole bone-in or boneless pork butt (5 to 7 pounds; 2.25 to 3kg)

  • 1 cup ketchup (8 ounces; about 225g)

  • 1/2 cup dark molasses (4 ounces; about 115g)

  • 1/2 cup (120ml) cider vinegar, divided

  • 2 tablespoons (30ml) Worcestershire sauce

  • 1 tablespoon (15ml) high-quality liquid smoke, such as Wright’s (see Note)

  • 1 tablespoon (15ml) brown mustard

  • 2 teaspoons (10ml) hot sauce

  • 1 tablespoon (15ml) vegetable oil

  • 1 large onion, finely minced (about 6 ounces; 170g)

  • 1 cup (240ml) bourbon

  • 1/2 cup (120ml) homemade or store-bought low-sodium chicken stock or water

  1. Adjust oven rack to lower position and preheat oven to 300°F (150°C). Combine sugar, salt, paprika, cumin, black pepper, coriander, ground fennel seed, and cayenne pepper in a small bowl and mix. Season pork with 2 to 3 tablespoons spice mixture, making sure to rub it on all sides. Reserve remaining spice mixture.

  2. Whisk together ketchup, molasses, half of cider vinegar, Worcestershire sauce, liquid smoke, mustard, and hot sauce in a medium bowl. Whisk in remaining spice mixture. Set aside.

  3. Heat oil in a Dutch oven over medium-high heat until shimmering. Add pork and cook, turning occasionally, until well browned on all sides, about 5 minutes total. (Pork will brown fast because of the sugar. Do not let it burn.) Add onion and cook, stirring and scraping up browned bits from the bottom of the pan, until softened, about 2 minutes.

    Serious Eats

  4. Turn off burner and add bourbon. Relight burner. Carefully ignite the bourbon with a long match or lighter. (Stand back and make sure there is nothing flammable above it; it will produce tall flames. ) Let cook until flames die out, about 2 minutes.

    Serious Eats

  5. Make sure pork is oriented fat side up. Add half of sauce and chicken stock or water. Cover Dutch oven, transfer to oven, and cook until pork is just starting to turn tender, about 4 hours. Remove lid and continue cooking until a knife or fork shows very little resistance when twisted inside the meat and a dark bark has formed, about 1 hour longer.

    Serious Eats

  6. Transfer pork to a large bowl, reserving liquid in pot. Using a ladle, skim off excess fat and discard. Add reserved sauce and remaining vinegar to pot and whisk to combine. When pork is cool enough to handle, shred with two forks.

    Serious Eats

  7. Transfer shredded pork to pot and toss with sauce. (If making ahead to serve over the course of several meals, store pork and sauce separately, adding sauce only to the portion you are serving immediately.) Season to taste with more salt, sugar, liquid smoke, or cider vinegar. Serve.

    Serious Eats

Special Equipment

Dutch oven

Notes

Use a high-quality liquid smoke, with no ingredients other than water and smoke. Avoid brands with molasses or vinegar, as these can affect flavor. For a stronger smoke flavor, combine 2 tablespoons (30ml) liquid smoke and 3/4 cup kosher salt (7 1/2 ounces; 210g) with 1 gallon (3.75L) cold water. Submerge uncooked pork and let rest in refrigerator for at least 1 hour and up to 8.

Sauna stove Everest 24 Light steam (281) under lining. RF production. Products webpage.

The Everest Light Steam sauna stove is designed for use in steam rooms up to 26m3 3 . The oven is ideal for creating a “Russian bath” temperature regime.

The Everest Light Steam stove has a prefabricated structure, devoid of additional welded and threaded joints, the stove is assembled according to the “protrusion-groove” system.

The firebox of the Everest Light Steam sauna stove is made of high-quality heat-resistant cast iron. In place of the flame arrester in the upper part of the firebox, there is a closed heater made of stainless steel 3 mm thick. The volume of the heater is designed for 25-30 kilograms of stones.

The heater is supplied with water using the steam generator included in the delivery.

The stove is equipped with a blind cast-iron furnace door Vesuvius 281. “Everest Light Steam” is a modern, high-tech stove for a bath, with a long service life and the ability to easily create a Russian bath mode, with high-quality fine steam.

The stove variant shown is designed for lining with stone or brick. It is possible to finish the stove with facings made of natural stone.

Temperature, °С

Humidity, %

Time, t (min)

Classical Russian bath

45-65

40-65

50

Hot Russian bath

70-90

20-35

60

Turkish bath

40-45

approx. 100

40

Finnish sauna

90-110

5-15

80

*The appearance of the product may differ slightly from the photos on the website

Width:

415 mm

Height:

845 mm

Depth:

8 12 mm

Series:

EVEREST 24 Light Steam

Steam room volume:

from 14 to 24 m3

Furnace material:

Heat-resistant cast iron (GOST 1412-85)

Furnace length:

450 mm

Thickness and fireboxes:

10-11 mm

Length of furnace tunnel:

235 mm

Weight:

191 kg

Type of heater:

closed

Material of closed heater:

stainless steel AISI 430

Chimney diameter:

120 mm

Fuel

firewood

Door type:

without glass

Door model:

Vesuvius 281

Door material:

heat-resistant cast iron (GOST 14 12-85)

Furnace door outer size:

415*425 mm

Furnace tunnel:

with extension

Convector type:

without casing

Stone weight in closed heater:

30 kg

lamellar graphite (GOST 1412-85) was developed and put into practice more than 35 years ago. During this time, hundreds of millions of products made of GOST cast iron have proven their quality, reliability and durability.

In the Soviet Union, the technologies for producing high-quality heat-resistant cast irons were perfected. The composition and characteristics of the resulting cast iron were based on GOST, and as a result of processing a standardized alloy, products of excellent quality were obtained.

The Vesuvius company in its technological processes relies on many years of experience of the best casters and all cast iron found in Vesuvius products is produced in accordance with GOST 1412-85.

Everest sauna stove 24 Light steam (280). RF production. Products webpage.

Everest Light Steam Sauna Stove made of heat-resistant cast iron features closed heater made of eco-friendly, economical stainless steel AISI 430 . Such an addition to the updated Everest range allows you to get any required type of steam from the Easy Steam series ovens. Drip water supply, through a special system into a closed heater, allows you to get high-quality superheated fine steam in the right quantities, without fear of flooding the stove. At the same time, the best characteristics of the Everest furnace line made of heat-resistant cast iron remained at a high level: factory cast iron of optimal thickness; high heat capacity; significant furnace power; easy-to-install design.

The model is available with two types of doors – with a blind door and a door with glass.

The package includes: Prefabricated stove with a removable furnace tunnel and a cast-iron door. Cylindrical closed heater made of AISI 430 stainless steel, designed for loading 35-40 kg of fine fraction stones. air supply to the secondary afterburning area. Massive cast-iron grate. Ash box made of durable steel, which allows you to quickly clean the furnace. Steel convection casing for laying stones. Heat-resistant sealant for assembling the furnace. Installation and operation instructions.

Everest Light Steam is designed to work in a steam room with a volume of 14 to 26 cubic meters .

The design of the furnace is prefabricated, the body consists of cast iron plates with fins on the outside to increase the heat transfer area. The furnace after firing is assembled in a steam room, at the installation site, fastened with a sealant.

Combustion chamber cover with rounded corners. The smooth cover does not allow flue gases to accumulate in the corners and ensures a more complete combustion of the fuel. As a result of this design, you will get a greater thermal efficiency of the cast iron stove Light Steam.

The outlet of the chimney pipe is located in the top cover of the furnace, separated from the combustion chamber by a closed heater, which acts as a flame arrester. Smoke enters the chimney, having previously given up maximum energy to the lower part of the closed heater and the stones lying on it.

Temperature, °С

Humidity, %

Time, t (min)

Classical Russian bath

45-65

40-65

50

Hot Russian bath

70-90

20-35

60

Turkish bath

40-45

ok. 100

40

Finnish sauna

90-110

5-15

80

*The appearance of the product may vary slightly from the photos on the website

900 mm

Series:

EVEREST 24 Light Steam

Steam room volume:

from 14 to 24 m3

Furnace material:

Heat-resistant cast iron (GOST 1412-85) ki:

450 mm

Firebox thickness:

10-11 mm

Length of furnace tunnel:

235 mm

Weight:

205 kg

Type of heater:

closed

Material of closed heater :

stainless steel AISI 430

Chimney diameter:

120 mm

Fuel:

firewood

Door type:

with glass

Door model:

Vesuvius 280

Door material:

heat-resistant cast iron (GOST 1412-85)

Furnace door size:

415*425 mm

005

200-220 kg

Weight of stones in a closed heater:

30 kg

* The State Standard for lamellar graphite iron (GOST 1412-85) was developed and put into practice more than 35 years ago.