Bluetooth on ear headset: BlueParrott M300-XT Review | PCMag

BlueParrott M300-XT Review | PCMag

BlueParrott specializes in Bluetooth headsets that need to work in busy, loud environments, and the M300-XT is made for people frequently on the go. Its single lightweight earpiece fits comfortably and securely, and its unassuming boom mic stays out of the way. Best of all, at $99.99, it’s priced lower than many of the pro-grade Bluetooth headsets we test. The only potential stumbling block is that, while weather resistant, the headset isn’t fully waterproof, which may or may not be necessary for the type of work you do. Otherwise, the M300-XT nails the balance between performance and affordability.

Small and Comfortable

Weighing in at just 0.7 ounces, the 4.4-by-2.4-by-1.0-inch M300-XT (HWD) has a secure fit that doesn’t weigh your ear down even during daylong use. Its black, over-ear hook design has a built-in boom mic that swivels not only toward or away from your mouth, but also rotates at the base so that the earpiece can be worn on either ear.  

There’s a flexible portion of the earpiece that sits just over the top of your ear—the fit might be a little tricky at first for those who wear glasses, especially if those glasses have chunky frames with thicker temples, as the temples will be sharing real estate with the somewhat bulky back end of the earpiece. This isn’t a deal breaker, you just have to fiddle with the fit early on to get things secure, and this is more or less par for the course in the realm of monaural Bluetooth headsets.

The M300-XT ships with three ear gels in small, medium, and large sizes. It’s important to try the various ear gel sizes and get the best possible in-ear seal—the medium gel is the default option and should fit most users well. Aside from the gels, the headset ships with a USB-C-to-USB-A charging cable of generous length, which connects to an uncovered USB-C port at the back end of the ear hook portion of the headset.

Similar Products

4.0

Excellent

Plantronics Voyager 5200

4. 0

Excellent

Sennheiser Presence UC ML

3.0

Average

BlueParrott C400-XT

4.5

Outstanding

Jabra Evolve2 65

4.0

Excellent

BlueParrott B550-XT

4.0

Excellent

Plantronics Voyager 4220 UC

We were able to get a secure fit, but it’s worth noting that the shape of the eartips isn’t that of typical in-canal eartips. As a result, your ear canal doesn’t necessarily get sealed off in the same way, and this can create scenarios that, despite the actual fit being secure, can feel somewhat open at the ear canal. It’s possible to fiddle with the fit and get a tighter seal, but we’d have preferred a more traditional eartip with a simple in-canal seal.

Because the end of the eartip widens rather than narrows, it doesn’t actually enter the edge of the canal and seal it off; it instead sits outside the canal and sort of blocks it a little. Perhaps the goal here is to keep a semi-open feel, allowing you to still hear a bit of your surroundings, but you already have that with your open ear. I’m sure a compelling argument can be made for the almost-open eartip design, but it can at times make it harder to hear what’s coming through the earpiece, depending on surrounding noise levels and what you’re listening to on the other end.

The headset carries an IP54 durability rating. This means that, on scale of 1 to 6, it has a dust ingress protection rating of 5, which is quite good, and on a scale of 1 to 8, it has a liquid ingress protection level rating of 4, which is fairly modest. It means the headset can withstand light splashes or misting, but don’t rinse it off under a faucet, submerge it, or wear it in heavy rain.

Along the headset’s back end, there are three buttons for power, volume up, and volume down. The power button also answers or ends calls, and summons your phone’s voice assistant when held down. The plus/minus buttons control volume. You can stream audio to the earpiece, but there’s no track navigation function for skipping forward or backward, and obviously, any musical audio experience is going to be fairly limited by the single-ear design.

There’s also a multifunction Parrott button, which requires configuration in the BlueParrott app for Android and iOS. As of this writing, the app hasn’t been fully updated to reflect the recent relase of the M300-XT; it was able to recognize the M300-XT, but not unlock all of its potential. Once the headset is fully supported, you can use the app to assign various functions to the Parrott button—for instance, it can trigger a third-party push-to-talk app, such as Verizon Push to Talk Plus, AT&T Enhanced PTT, ESChat (Push-to-Talk), or PoC PTT Profile. The button can also trigger voice memos, speed dialing, or be used to mute audio. All of these functions, and assorted other options, are assigned in the app.

The M300-XT supports Bluetooth 5.1 and the SBC codec. Internally, the headset houses a 10.3mm driver delivering a frequency range of 20Hz to 20kHz and an impedance of 32 ohms.

BlueParrott estimates battery life to be roughly 14 hours, but your results will vary slightly with your volume levels.

Clear Calls From Anywhere

The M300-XT employs two MEMS microphones and background noise redction to deliver audio emphasizing your voice. This style of microphone isn’t necessarily focused on the same type of clarity that a broadcast or recording studio microphone is after—instead it zeroes in on the human voice and rejects frequency ranges that interfere with intelligibility. Thus, when there’s no noise to contend with, you don’t necessarily get what amounts to a pristine signal; it can sound a little bit like a walkie-talkie signal, but with much better intelligibility. When you finish speaking, and in between words, the signal often sounds like it drops out completely, even when there’s no background noise to contend with. This can be disconcerting at first, but it’s unlikely you’ll ever misunderstand a word spoken through this mic.

When we tested the mic’s intelligibility against a bed of loud music playing through near-field monitors, it performed well in the sense that we could always understand every word we recorded for reference. Obviously, this kind of stress test is intended to expose the headset’s weaknesses, so if you’re in a scenario that is as loud as rock music blaring from speakers just a few feet away, the result will sound something like the music getting squashed and reduced to a thin static, while your voice also gets a little squashed, but is the only intelligible part of the signal the mic picks up. In this type of situation, there’s always going to be some distortion, but again, we could understand every word that was spoken, even if the audio was less than pristine.

In a more typical scenario, with the volume lower, your speaking voice comes through far more clearly. When your voice switches from calm, measured tones to nearly yelling, the mic doesn’t seem to change in terms of intelligibility—the background audio is still squashed, and your voice is still transmitted with the same clarity. Switching from music to a TV commercial in the background with lots of voiceover speaking to contend with, the mic still did an excellent job of picking up my voice and separating it from the other voice in the background.

With low-frequency rumble (somewhat similar to what you’d hear inside an airplane) playing at high volume through near-field monitors at close range, the M300-XT does some interesting things. Between words, we hear nothing at all, and when I speak, it lets my voice through and the least amount of outside noise it possibly can. Some of the rumble makes it through, which makes me sound a little bit like a cyborg or Kylo Ren, but the words are always intelligible. The same is true with a recording of a busy cafe playing at a high volume, including chatter, laughter, along with plates and utensils clattering and clinging. Ultimately, in all of these high-volume noise tests, every word I spoke was easy to understand.

It Gets the Job Done

For the price, the BlueParrott M300-XT is one of the best affordable Bluetooth headsets we’ve tested in recent memory. For more money, the monaural, over-ear $200 BlueParrott B550-XT is an excellent alternative, while the $280 Sennheiser Presence UC ML is an even smaller single-ear option for noisy scenarios. For $100, however, there’s really very little to complain about here, as the M300-XT really only needs to do one thing well: deliver ideal vocal clarity in loud scenarios. The headset gets the job done, and does so a price that many people will find just right.

BlueParrott M300-XT

Pros

  • Affordable

  • Superior voice intelligibility in noisy environments

  • Comfortable ear gels

Cons

  • Not fully waterproof

  • Getting a good in-ear seal takes a bit of work

The Bottom Line

BlueParrott’s M300-XT Bluetooth headset is affordable, comfortable, and delivers clear voice quality in loud work environments.

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The 4 Best On-Ear Headphones – Summer 2023: Reviews

  1. Table of Contents
  2. Intro
  3. Best Headphones

    1. Best Mid-Range

      1. Best Budget

        1. Best Wired

          1. Notable Mentions
          2. Recent Updates
          3. All Reviews
          4. Discussions

          Updated Jun 23, 2023 at 09:02 am

          By Kieran Dunn

          Although the popularity of on-ear headphones has waned over the years, many people still find them to be a good compromise between the portability of in-ears and the comfort of over-ears. They have smaller ear cups that fit directly on your ears, making them generally more compact and breathable than over-ears without needing earbuds sticking inside your ear. However, they tend to fit tighter than over-ears, which can put an uncomfortable amount of pressure on your ears, depending on the design. The best on-ears have a fit that works for you and a sound profile that suits the type of music you listen to. The best models even have Bluetooth support and active noise cancelling (ANC).

          We’ve tested over 65 pairs of on-ears, and below are our recommendations for the best headphones with an on-ear design. Also, check out our recommendations for the best headphones, the best over-ear headphones, and the best wireless Bluetooth headphones.

          1. Best On-Ear Headphones

            Beats Solo3 2019 Wireless

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            Neutral Sound

            7.2

            Commute/Travel

            6. 6

            Sports/Fitness

            7.3

            Office

            6.4

            Wireless Gaming

            5.6

            Wired Gaming

            5.3

            Phone Calls

            6.0

            Type

            On-ear

            Enclosure

            Closed-Back

            Wireless

            Yes

            Transducer

            Dynamic

            Noise Cancelling

            No

            Mic

            Yes

            See all our test results

            The best on-ear headphones we’ve tested are the Beats Solo3 2019 Wireless. Although they’re a bit dated by today’s standards, these iconic headphones have become emblematic of the on-ear design, thanks to their colorful look, which helps them stand out from the crowd. They’re also equipped with a W1 chip to pair them with other Apple devices seamlessly. Thanks to their over 38 hours of continuous playback time, they’ll easily survive long days on the go without a recharge.

            Like earlier Beats headphones, these on-ears have a bass-heavy sound that delivers extra thump, rumble, and boom to mixes, making them a great choice for genres like EDM and hip-hop. That said, the extra bass muddies the rest of the mix, and they lack customization features to help you adjust them otherwise. Unlike their higher-end (and unfortunately discontinued) sibling, the Beats Solo Pro Wireless, they also lack noise cancelling and have trouble blocking background noise like bus engines and ambient chatter.

            See our review

          2. Best Mid-Range On-Ear Headphones

            JBL Live 460NC Wireless

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            Neutral Sound

            7. 6

            Commute/Travel

            7.4

            Sports/Fitness

            7.2

            Office

            7.3

            Wireless Gaming

            5.8

            Wired Gaming

            7.4

            Phone Calls

            6.7

            Type

            On-ear

            Enclosure

            Closed-Back

            Wireless

            Yes

            Transducer

            Dynamic

            Noise Cancelling

            Yes

            Mic

            Yes

            See all our test results

            For a cheaper option, look at the best on-ear wireless headphones we’ve tested in the mid-price range: the JBL Live 460NC Wireless. They represent a good option at a much lower price. They have a well-balanced default sound profile suitable for various genres and work with a companion app that includes a graphic EQ and presets for customization. They support multi-device pairing, meaning you can stay connected with your computer and phone simultaneously.

            Their battery provides around 29 hours of continuous use, meaning they easily last through a workday or long flight. Unlike the Beats Solo3 2019 Wireless, they have an ANC system, which does a fair job of blocking out background noise across the range. It has trouble effectively reducing bass-range noise like rumbling bus and plane engines but does better at cutting down ambient chatter. They’re well-built and have a decently comfortable fit for most. However, their clamping force makes them have a tight fit, which can become uncomfortable over time.

            See our review

          3. Best Budget On-Ear Headphones

            Sony WH-CH520 Wireless

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            Neutral Sound

            7. 4

            Commute/Travel

            6.3

            Sports/Fitness

            7.0

            Office

            6.6

            Wireless Gaming

            5.7

            Wired Gaming

            5.5

            Phone Calls

            6.7

            Type

            On-ear

            Enclosure

            Closed-Back

            Wireless

            Yes

            Transducer

            Dynamic

            Noise Cancelling

            No

            Mic

            Yes

            See all our test results

            While the Sony WH-CH520 Wireless have an MSRP of just over $50, you can find them on sale for a more wallet-friendly price; if you can get them at a lower cost, their extra features make them worth checking out. They have a slightly warm sound profile out of the box that results in smooth vocals and instruments. That said, their companion app offers a graphic EQ and presets so that you can tailor their sound to your needs. They also support multi-device pairing, so you can stay connected to your smartphone and PC simultaneously, and have a virtual soundstage feature to help immerse you in your audio.

            These on-ears last over 52 hours continuously, which is great for long days on the go or at your desk. They also have a decently comfortable fit and are fairly well-built. Their plastic design isn’t the sturdiest, but that’s normal at this price point. However, unlike the JBL 460NC Wireless, they lack noise cancelling and struggle to block ambient sound. They also don’t have an AUX port, so you can’t use them wired. If you care about optional analog connectivity, consider the Skullcandy Riff Wireless 2, which have full audio and mic compatibility via analog, but you can still use them wirelessly. However, they aren’t as well-built or comfortable as the Sony headphones.

            See our review

          4. Best Wired On-Ear Headphones

            Audio-Technica ATH-M60x

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            Mixed Usage

            5.8

            Neutral Sound

            7.5

            Commute/Travel

            5.3

            Sports/Fitness

            5.7

            Office

            5.8

            Wireless Gaming

            4.5

            Wired Gaming

            6. 3

            Phone Call

            2.0

            Type

            On-ear

            Enclosure

            Closed-Back

            Wireless

            No

            Transducer

            Dynamic

            Noise Cancelling

            No

            Mic

            No

            See all our test results

            The best wired on-ear headphones we’ve tested are the Audio-Technica ATH-M60x. If you’re looking for something for listening to music or casual daily use and prefer wired headphones, these have a comfortable fit and aren’t too tight on your head. They come with a detachable cable and two 1/8″ to 1/4″ adapters, meaning you can easily plug them into a mixer or amp or a phone or computer. They’re designed with audiophiles in mind, so unlike the Beats Solo3 2019 Wireless, they don’t have a mic or onboard controls. As a result, you can’t use them to make phone calls or easily skip a track when you’re on the go.

            Their sound profile is neutral and well-balanced, so they’re suitable for fans of different genres and types of content. While most of the bass response is very accurate, there’s some overemphasis in the high-bass range, adding a touch of extra boom and warmth to mixes. Vocals and lead instruments still sound present and clear, though. These on-ears are also decently breathable, comfortable, and well-built. They even come with a soft pouch to keep dust off the headphones when not in use.

            See our review

          Notable Mentions

          • Jabra Evolve2 65 Wireless:
            The Jabra Evolve2 65 Wireless are call-oriented headphones optimized for United Communications (UC) or Microsoft Teams. They have a much better mic performance than the JBL Live 460NC Wireless but a much weaker noise isolation performance.
            See our review

          Recent Updates

          1. Jun 23, 2023:
            We’ve validated the picks for this article as the best on-ear headphones in their respective categories.

          2. May 30, 2023:
            We replaced the Skullcandy Riff 2 Wireless with the Sony WH-CH520 Wireless as the Sony offer a more customizable and well-rounded performance.

          3. Apr 27, 2023:
            Checked that the picks are relevant and available.

          4. Mar 17, 2023:
            Replaced the Beats Solo Pro Wireless with the Beats Solo3 2019 Wireless as they’ve been discontinued and are no longer available.

          5. Feb 17, 2023:
            Checked that picks represent the best recommendations and that the products are in stock.

          All Reviews

          Our recommendations above are what we think are currently the best on-ear Bluetooth headphones and on-ear wired headphones for most people to buy. We factor in the price (cheaper headphones win over pricier ones if the difference isn’t worth it), feedback from our visitors, and availability (no headphones that are difficult to find or almost out of stock everywhere).

          If you would like to choose for yourself, here is the list of all our reviews for on-ear headphones. Be careful not to get caught up in the details. There are no perfect headphones. Personal taste, preference, and listening habits will matter more in your selection.

          How to connect wireless headphones to the phone?

          Don’t know how to connect your wireless headphones to your phone, or maybe a problem occurred later during use? Dr.Head will help you figure everything out, because the process is not much more complicated than connecting wired headphones!

          Dear reader! We are glad that long reads do not scare you, and you read our articles and leave comments. In gratitude, we give you a BLOG promo code, which will give you a 5% discount on everything except promotional items and products of certain brands.

          There are several types of wireless connection, but for headphones (as well as portable speakers) today only a Bluetooth connection is relevant, so we will talk about how to connect Bluetooth headphones / headset to a phone (smartphone or tablet).

          • You can read about what types of wireless connections exist, as well as other parameters of wireless headphones, in our article on how to choose wireless headphones.

          • We also recommend reading our article: Sound via Bluetooth: versions and codecs, do they affect sound quality?

          Connect wireless headphones to phone

          1. Turn headphones on / put them into pairing mode

          2. Open Bluetooth settings on your smartphone, turn on Bluetooth

          3. 900 02 Select the headphones to be connected from the list and click on them to connect

          This is a general connection scheme that is suitable for the vast majority of cases (both for gadgets with Android and iOS), and yet, there are hundreds and even thousands of different headphones, every possible little thing / distinctive feature cannot be mentioned, so the user manual / information from the manufacturer specifically for your model is the best that can be recommended.

          If you don’t have the manual, try looking it up on the manufacturer’s website or by searching for “headphone brand and model + manual”.

          Let’s analyze this brief scheme in more detail, and also consider some problems that may arise when connecting a headset or acoustics to wireless headphones (hereinafter, for simplicity, we will simply say “headphones”).

          First connection / pairing (Pairing)

          Turn on the headphones / put them into pairing mode
          • Press or hold the power button for a couple of seconds. It can be an ON/OFF button, a play button, or a button with a light indicator.

          • If you have true wireless headphones, you usually need to place them in the charging case for a few seconds and then remove them. Another common option for TWS headphones is to hold down the main button / sensor on the main or both headphones for a few seconds.

          • There may not be a power button, for example? The Sennheiser Momentum Wireless 3 turns on automatically as soon as you unfold it from the folded state.

          • If the headphones do not turn on, try charging them, for some models this is a mandatory requirement before turning them on for the first time. It may take from one to several hours to fully charge, depending on the model.

          • After the first turn on, some headphones automatically enter pairing mode – as a rule, this is accompanied by a light indication (most often – blue flicker) or voice prompts (Pairing).

          • If this does not happen, you need to initiate pairing manually: press the dedicated pairing button with the Bluetooth icon on the headphones or a scheme specific to your model. Often the pairing mode is launched by the same buttons as the on / off headphones, but for it you need to hold them down not for a second or two, but for 3-8 seconds.

          Open the Bluetooth settings on the smartphone, turn on Bluetooth
          The phone will search for available devices, select the headphones to connect from the list and click on them to connect
          • If the headphones do not appear in the list, try updating available devices, turn off/on Bluetooth on your phone, or restart the pairing process on the headphones.

          • Some headphones, after searching, can initiate the connection themselves, it will be enough to press the connection / Pair button in the pop-up message on the phone screen.

          • Some phones may ask you to enter a PIN code, try the standard “0000” or the code given in the user manual.

          If both devices to be connected support NFC technology, then instead of the described process, you just need to put the included headphones or their charging case to the phone in the area with the NFC sensor, and the device will offer to connect.

          Apple devices do not support NFC, but modern AirPods and Beats can automatically pair when you open the charging case cover next to the iOS device.

          Reconnection

          When a pair has already been created, reconnection in most cases occurs automatically, just turn on the headphones when Bluetooth is on on the phone.

          Troubleshooting Bluetooth Headphones Connecting to Your Phone

          If the headphones (or one of the True Wireless Headphones) no longer pair with your phone, try the following standard steps or see the troubleshooting steps in your model’s instructions:

          • Verify that the headphones are charged.

          • Restart Bluetooth on your phone.

          • Reset headphones (off/on).

          • Restart your phone.

          • Unpair on the phone (Unpair in headphone settings, inside Bluetooth menu on phone) and re-pair.

          • Reset the headphones to factory settings (Hard Reset) – if the headphones have such a function, it should be indicated in the user manual or on the manufacturer’s website.

          If you have any questions – ask them in the comments. Good sound and stable Bluetooth connection to everyone!

          All articles, reviews, discussions and opinions are in our Telegram channel. Subscribe and join the chat discussions!

          How to connect Bluetooth headphones to a computer or laptop on Windows 10

          I recently bought myself Bluetooth headphones, and decided to write a small instruction on how to connect them to a laptop or a computer on which Windows 10 is installed. In fact, everything is very simple there. And if everything is fine, then the connection process takes less than a minute. But there are times when things don’t work out. For example, you can’t turn on Bluetooth in Windows 10, the computer does not see wireless headphones, the connection fails, no sound is played, etc. Therefore, in this instruction I will show you how to connect Bluetooth headphones to a computer. And if something doesn’t go according to plan, some error appears, or other problems arise, then you describe your case in the comments. I will try to help everyone.

          Windows 10 has a much better Bluetooth experience than previous versions. The system itself almost always automatically finds and installs the Bluetooth adapter driver, understands which device you have connected to the computer, and how to “communicate” with it. After connecting my JBL E45BT headphones to an ASUS laptop via Bluetooth, I realized that at least something in Windows 10 works stably.

          In the playback device settings, I configured everything in such a way that after turning off the power to the headphones, the sound automatically goes to the speakers. And after turning on the headphones, literally in a couple of seconds they automatically connect to the laptop and the sound goes to the headphones. That is, once set up the connection, and in the future, the headphones are connected automatically. I will also write about this at the end of the article. You may find this information useful.

          What do I need to connect Bluetooth headphones to a computer or laptop?

          There are several nuances:

          • If you have a laptop, then it most likely has a built-in Bluetooth adapter. This is very easy to check by looking at the specifications of your laptop. All you need is to install the driver for the Bluetooth adapter if Windows 10 didn’t install it by itself. Most often, the driver is installed automatically. In the settings, in the “Devices” section, you should have a tab “Bluetooth and other devices”. I wrote more about this in the article: how to enable and configure Bluetooth on a laptop with Windows 10. And if you have Windows 11: how to enable Bluetooth on Windows 11.
          • If you have a desktop computer (PC), then Bluetooth is most likely not on it. Although, if I’m not mistaken, some new motherboards have a built-in adapter. If it is not there, then you will not be able to connect the headphones. But there is a solution, you can buy a USB Bluetooth adapter. How to choose it, I wrote in the article a Bluetooth adapter for a computer. How to choose. It is connected to the USB port of the computer, a driver is installed on it (automatically, from the included disk, or from the Internet), and you can connect your Bluetooth headphones to the PC. The price of such adapters is low. Approximately, like a pack of good chips 🙂 Of course, there are also expensive models.

          And of course, we need the headphones themselves, which can connect via Bluetooth connection. This is usually written on the packaging, in the specifications, etc.

          Update: How to connect Bluetooth headphones in Windows 11. If you have Windows 11 installed on your laptop or PC, follow the link and see the detailed instructions for connecting headphones.

          Connect Bluetooth headphones to Windows 10

          I think it’s better to do everything step by step. So it will be more clear, and it’s easier for me to write instructions.

          1
          First we need to turn on Bluetooth on our laptop or PC. If it’s not already enabled. If enabled, there should be a blue icon in the notification bar. And if it is not there, then you can open the notification center and turn it on by clicking on the appropriate button.

          But you can not do this, but immediately go to the parameters and activate it there.

          2
          Open Start and select Settings. There, go to the section called “Devices”. See screenshot.

          3
          On the “Bluetooth and other devices” tab, enable the wireless adapter (if it is disabled), and click on “Add Bluetooth or other device”.

          4
          Turn on your headphones. The indicator should blink blue (this means that they are available for search). If it does not flash, the headphones may be connected to another device. Disable them. Or find the button with the “Bluetooth” icon on the case and press it (you may need to press and hold). It all depends on the specific model.

          5
          In the window on the computer, select “Bluetooth” and our headphones should appear in the list of available devices. Just click on them.

          The status should be “Connected”, or “Connected voice, music”.

          6
          Our headphones also appear in the list of connected devices. If you click on them, you can disconnect or connect, as well as delete them. Then you can reconnect, as I showed above.

          After turning on the power of the headphones, they should automatically connect to the computer. I have it, without any additional settings. But the sound may not automatically go to the headphones. It needs to be switched in the management of playback devices. Now I will tell you how to fix it. Make it so that after turning on the headphones, the sound from the computer is automatically played through them. And after turning off – through the speakers, or the built-in speakers of the laptop.

          Automatic sound switching for Bluetooth headphones

          Go to “Playback Devices”.

          Update. After the next Windows 10 update, the settings have changed a bit. To open the menu shown below, after right-clicking, select “Sounds” and go to the “Playback” tab.

          Or select “Open audio settings” from the menu and set the desired audio input and output device in the settings.

          Selects your Bluetooth headphones as an output or input device (if you have headphones with a microphone and you need one).

          Next, right-click on the headphones and select “Set as default”.

          That’s all. When I turn on my headphones, they automatically connect and music starts playing through them. When I turn it off, the speakers sound. Very comfortably.

          Possible connection problems

          Let’s look at a few common problems:

          • Problem: The Bluetooth button and the section in the settings are missing in the computer settings. Solution: you need to install the driver on the Bluetooth adapter. Check if it is in Device Manager. You also need to make sure that your computer has the adapter itself. On desktop computers, they usually do not. You need to use external ones that connect via USB.
          • Problem: The computer cannot find the headphones. Do not connect to a computer. Solution: Make sure the headphones are turned on and searchable. The indicator on the headphones should flash blue. Turn them off and on again. They should also be close to the computer. You can try connecting them to another device. For example, to a smartphone.
          • Problem: Headphones are connected to the computer, but there is no sound. Do not play sound. Solution: set their status to “Use by default” in Windows 10 settings. As I showed above.

          In some cases, you may need to install drivers, or a program that can be downloaded from the website of the manufacturer of your Bluetooth stereo headset.