Best ergonomic mouse wireless: Anker Wireless Vertical Mouse Review

Anker Wireless Vertical Mouse Review

Tested using
Methodology v1.3

Reviewed Jan 31, 2020 at 10:35 am

Latest change: Test bench update Sep 06, 2022 at 09:00 am

By Samuel Breton, Jean-Simon Bonneterre, and Yannick Khong

7.1

Office/Multimedia

6.0

Video Games (FPS)

5.2

Video Games (MMO)

7.0

Travel

overview
test results
deals
discussions

Type

Vertical

Connectivity

Wireless

The Anker Wireless Vertical Mouse is a decent mouse to use in an office if you’re looking for something to put less strain on your wrist. Its vertical design is quite narrow and comfortable to use, as you simply rest your hand on the mouse, keeping your wrist in a neutral position. However, some people might not like that its performance isn’t the best and might notice that the sensor is quite inconsistent. It also has a high click-latency and can only cycle between three CPI presets.

Our Verdict

7.1

Office/Multimedia

The Anker Wireless Vertical Mouse is a decent choice if you’re looking for an ergonomic option. It’s comfortable to use during long hours and its vertical design helps with putting your wrist in a neutral position. However, you can’t really program its six buttons, but they’re still useful for more fluid web-browsing.

Pros

  • Very comfortable to use.

  • Well-built for budget product.

Cons

  • High click latency.

  • Isn’t Bluetooth compatible.

  • Inconsistent performance.

6.0

Video Games (FPS)

The Anker vertical ergonomic optical mouse isn’t designed for gaming. Its sensor has sub-par gaming performance and is quite inconsistent.

Pros

  • Very comfortable to use.

  • Well-built for budget product.

Cons

  • High click latency.

  • Isn’t Bluetooth compatible.

  • Inconsistent performance.

See our Video Games (FPS) Recommendations

5.2

Video Games (MMO)

The Anker Wireless Vertical Mouse isn’t designed for gaming. It doesn’t have many side buttons and its overall performance isn’t on-par with gaming mice.

Pros

  • Very comfortable to use.

  • Well-built for budget product.

Cons

  • High click latency.

  • Isn’t Bluetooth compatible.

  • Inconsistent performance.

See our Video Games (MMO) Recommendations

7.0

Travel

The Anker Wireless Vertical Mouse is a decent choice for travel. While its body is rather bulky and heavy, it has an integrated slot for its receiver, making it way easier to bring it around. You should still be able to toss it in a bag and its wireless design is great to use in tighter spaces without being bothered by a dangling cable.

Pros

  • Very comfortable to use.

  • Well-built for budget product.

Cons

  • High click latency.

  • Isn’t Bluetooth compatible.

  • Inconsistent performance.

  • 7.1

    Office/Multimedia

  • 6.0

    Video Games (FPS)

  • 5.2

    Video Games (MMO)

  • 7. 0

    Travel

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  1. Updated Sep 06, 2022:
    We’ve converted this review to Test Bench 1.3. This update adds a new Sensor Latency test and makes minor changes to several of our existing tests, resulting in test result changes in several sections. For more information, you can check out our full changelog here.

  2. Updated Aug 25, 2022:
    We’ve converted this review to Test Bench 1.2. This update simplifies our Weight test and expands on our CPI test from Test Bench 1.1, resulting in changes to test results in both sections. For more details, you can see our complete changelog here.

  3. Updated Aug 19, 2022:
    We’ve converted this review to Test Bench 1. 1. This update revamps our Click Latency test and results in changes to test results. For more details, you can see our full changelog here.

  4. Updated Oct 19, 2020:
    Converted to Test Bench 1.0.

  5. Updated Jan 31, 2020:
    Review published.

  6. Updated Jan 28, 2020:
    Early access published.

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Differences Between Sizes And Variants

The only variant of this mouse is the one that comes with a rechargeable battery and a micro-USB charging cable. According to the manufacturer, the battery life is around a week; however, we haven’t tested it and can’t confirm. This seems to be the only difference between the mouse we reviewed and the rechargeable variant.

Compared To Other Mice

The Anker wireless ergonomic optical mouse is a decent option if you’re looking for an ergonomic design, although if you’re used to more traditional mice, it might take you a bit of time to get used to this type of design. Since it’s mainly geared towards office workers, gamers should look elsewhere, as they’re more than likely going to be disappointed by the sensor performance. See our buying recommendations for the best mice and the best wireless mice.

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The Logitech MX Vertical is a better vertical mouse than the Anker Wireless Vertical Mouse. You can use the Logitech via Bluetooth, and its receiver and its buttons are fully programmable inside the software. While the Anker doesn’t have software, its slimmer design is a bit more comfortable to grab. The Logitech’s overall performance is noticeably better than the Anker’s.

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The Logitech Lift and the Anker Wireless Vertical Mouse are wireless vertical mice designed for office and productivity, but the Logitech performs much better overall. The Logitech feels more comfortable in hand and has Bluetooth support, which the Anker lacks. The Logitech also has a better sensor with a wider CPI range in which you can more precisely set your CPI, better CPI variation, and much lower minimum lift-off distance. Also, the Logitech has significantly better click latency and software for customizing settings. On the other hand, the Anker is lighter and feels a bit sturdier.

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The Logitech MX Master 2S is a better overall mouse than the Anker Wireless Vertical Mouse, but it doesn’t offer as ergonomic a design as the Anker. The overall performance of the Logitech is better, but its design doesn’t put your wrist in a neutral position like the Anker’s vertical design.

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The Anker Wireless Vertical Mouse is better than the J-Tech Digital V628X. The Anker feels much better built, is much lighter, more comfortable, and has a much more consistent sensor. On the other hand, the J-Tech has companion software and a more adjustable CPI range. Neither mouse is great for small hands.

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The Logitech MX Master 3 is a more versatile mouse than the Anker Wireless Vertical Mouse. The Logitech has neat features, but it’s still a relatively standard mouse. While it has a slanted ergo-shape, the Logitech isn’t as ergonomic as an ergonomic, vertical mouse. The Logitech will be better suited for multimedia, but if you’re looking to reduce the strain on your wrist, the Anker is a better option.

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Test Results

Sort Category───────────RATINGSOffice/MultimediaVideo Games (FPS)Video Games (MMO)Travel

Category AllDesignControlOperating System And Software

Design

Type

Vertical

Lighting Color

No Lighting

The Anker vertical ergonomic optical mouse is sleek-looking. It might not have the same professional look as the Logitech MX Vertical, but its matte black finish looks good, although it’s prone to grease spots. It has a curved LED light, but it only acts as a CPI indicator or lights up when the battery is low. If you’re looking for a vertical mouse with a more customizable design, check out the J-Tech Digital V628X.

Length

4.9″ (124 mm)

Height

3.0″ (76 mm)

Width

2.4″ (62 mm)

Grip Width

46 mm

Volume

35.64 in³ (584 cm³)

Cable/Receiver Storing

Yes

Although this mouse is rather bulky, it doesn’t have a cumbersome cable and you can store the receiver on the underside of the mouse, making it easier to travel with.

The Anker vertical ergonomic optical mouse’s build quality is surprisingly great at this price point. The body feels well-built and durable. The smooth matte finish feels nice and the feet are decent as well. There’s a slight wobble on the mouse wheel, but that’s about it. Most people should be satisfied with the quality of this mouse.

Lowest Weight

102.4 g

Default Weight

112.5 g

Weight Distribution

Back-heavy

Extra Weights

No

The Anker wireless ergonomic optical mouse is fairly heavy, which makes it a bit hard to lift.

Left-Handed Friendly

No

Ambidextrous

No

Coating

Matte

Finger Rest

Thumb

The Anker vertical ergonomic optical mouse is very comfortable to use. Its vertical design puts your wrist in a more neutral position, and your hand doesn’t feel as open as when using the Logitech MX Vertical, thanks to its slimmer design. The buttons are easy to reach, and the matte finish helps to have a nice grip over the mouse. Note that it might take some time to get used to a vertical design if you’re used to more traditional mice. Unfortunately, it isn’t suitable for small hands, regardless of grip type. For another vertical design that’s better suited for smaller hands, check out the Logitech Lift.

Small Hand

No

Medium Hand

Yes

Large Hand

Yes

X.Large Hand

Yes

This design is usually made for a palm grip, although due to its size, people with small hands might have trouble reaching the scroll wheel and the forward side-button.

Small Hand

No

Medium Hand

Yes

Large Hand

Yes

X. Large Hand

Yes

Just like with a palm grip, people with small hands might have trouble reaching the forward button and the scroll wheel when using a claw grip.

Small Hand

No

Medium Hand

No

Large Hand

No

X.Large Hand

No

A vertical mouse isn’t designed for a fingertip grip and isn’t recommended with the Anker Wireless Vertical Mouse.

Maximum Of Paired Devices

1

Bluetooth

No

Receiver

Yes

Battery Type

2x AAA

Use When Charging

No ( Single use batteries)

On/Off Activation

Auto Off And On/Off Switch

Receiver Extender

No

Battery Indicator

Yes

The Anker vertical ergonomic optical mouse is wireless-only. You can connect it using its USB receiver and it doesn’t come with any charging cable as you need 2x AAA batteries to power it. The LED strip will flash red whenever the battery is low. Note that there’s a variant of this mouse with a rechargeable battery, which comes with a charging cable.

Connectivity

Wireless

Cable Length

N/A

Cable Type

No Cable

Permanent Kink

No

Port Type: Mouse End

No Port

Port Type: PC End

No Port

This mouse doesn’t have any cable as it needs physical batteries to work. However, there’s a variant with a rechargeable battery, which comes with a micro-USB charging cable, but we haven’t reviewed it.

Gliding Experience

Ok

Material

PTFE

Extra Included

No

  • Anker Wireless Vertical Mouse
  • USB receiver
  • Manual

Control

Total Number Of Buttons

6

Number Of Side Buttons

2

Number Of Programmable Inputs

0

Profile Switching Button

No

Gesture Support

No

The mouse features a total of six buttons, but since it doesn’t have software, you can’t program them to whatever you’d like. You have a typical two-side button layout and a big CPI switching button on the top of the mouse.

Expected Connection

28.4 ms

Wired

N/A

Receiver

28.4 ms

Bluetooth

N/A

The Anker vertical ergonomic optical mouse’s click latency is rather disappointing. It’s noticeably high for a mouse using a USB receiver, and this won’t be suitable for gaming. However, since this mouse is designed for office use, we don’t expect most people to be bothered by this on a daily basis.

SRAV @ 1600 CPI

-3.48%

SRAV @ 800 CPI

-1.46%

SRAV @ 400 CPI

N/A

SRAV @ Fixed CPI

N/A

Precision Error Between Speeds

2. 57%

Precision Error Between CPI

1.79%

Worst Tracking Error

-19.50%

Minimum CPI

800 CPI

Maximum CPI

1,600 CPI

CPI Adjustment Steps

400 CPI

Delay To Start Of Movement

50.2 ms

Delay At Half Movement

33.7 ms

Delay To End Of Movement

29.5 ms

Sensor Technology

Optical (LED)

Sensor Model

Not Specified

Works On Glass

No

Minimum Lift Off Distance

4.8 mm

Maximum Polling Rate

125 Hz

Scroll Wheel

Notched Wheel

Scroll Wheel Steps

24 Steps

Scroll Wheel Tilt

No

Thumb Wheel

No

Thumb Wheel Steps

No Thumb Wheel

The Anker vertical ergonomic optical mouse’s scroll wheel is okay. The increments are rather soft, but unfortunately, it doesn’t unlock for infinite scrolling, which makes it take a while to scroll through large documents. If you’re looking for an ergonomic mouse with L/R scroll wheel tilts, check out the Microsoft Sculpt Ergonomic Mouse.

Click Noise

Loud

Operating System And Software

Software Name

No software

Software Windows Compatibility

No

Software macOS Compatibility

No

Account Needed

No Software

On-Board Memory

No

CPI (DPI) Adjustment

No

Polling Rate Adjustment

No

Profile Configuration

No

RGB On/Off

No RGB

This mouse doesn’t have dedicated software for customization options.

Windows Compatibility

Fully

macOS Compatibility

Fully

The Anker Wireless Vertical Mouse has an exceptional compatibility with both Windows and macOS, as all buttons work as intended right out of the box.

The best ergonomic mice of 2023

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Reviews

What’s in this review

  • Best ergonomic mouse: Logitech MX Master 3

  • Best vertical ergonomic mouse: Logitech Lift

  • How we tested

  • Other ergonomic mice we tested

Benjamin Levin/CNN

cnn.com/_components/paragraph/instances/paragraph_30CAE82C-68D8-3ADB-8F5E-A52F9C4A72D2@published” data-editable=”text” data-component-name=”paragraph”>
Swapping out your old mouse (or trackpad) for an ergonomic model can make a world of difference. Just look at the ever-increasing number of companies offering ergonomically correct mice to combat users’ hand and wrist strain.

That’s why we’ve tested the top-rated ergonomic mice you can pair with an ergonomic keyboard to determine which is best for creating a truly comfortable workstation. And after putting 10 different models through their paces, we found one clear winner for overall use as well as a top vertical pick for those who want something especially easy on their wrists.

Logitech MX Master 3

Best ergonomic mouse

The Logitech MX Master 3 is an unequivocally comfortable mouse. It’s shaped to perfection, with special attention to the fingers that do the clicking. Using it felt like our fingers were lounging — with a sculpted ergonomic groove for nearly every finger.

$99.99 at Logitech

$99.99 at Amazon

Logitech Lift

Best vertical ergonomic mouse

Logitech

The best vertical mouse we tested, the Lift is especially ideal if you have wrist, arm or shoulder problems. It’s both cheaper and more compact than the popular MX Vertical, and it has the advantage of offering both left- and right-handed variations.

$69.99 at Logitech

$69.99 at Amazon

Logitech MX Master 3

Eric Ravenscraft/CNN

cnn.com/_components/paragraph/instances/paragraph_C0257399-ED37-93E1-7CB8-A52FC00714AD@published” data-editable=”text” data-component-name=”paragraph”>
The MX Master sculpt provides an extraordinary fit for the hand. From the back of the mouse begins an incline that peaks just below the base of your index and middle finger, so instead of hovering above the mouse, our primary clicking fingers relaxed on a solid structure. This provides a unique feeling of support lacking in the other mice we tested. From there, the mouse tapers off into a gentler slope toward the primary buttons and scroll wheel. There’s more than enough room for your clicking fingers, so even the largest hands should do just fine.

Your thumb gets special treatment too. The left side of the MX Master smoothly dips into a flattened section upon which your entire thumb can rest. It’s made of soft rubber with gentle ribbing for comfort and traction. We would have liked to see similar attention given to the ring and pinky fingers. There is a steep slope on the right side of the mouse that provides some support but not nearly as much as is given to the thumb. Regardless, our overall experience was one of unmatched clicking comfort.

Logitech made some really good decisions with the materials used on this mouse. The soft rubber on the thumb rest is a prime example, working its way up to the edges of the primary mouse buttons beneath your index and middle fingers, adding both comfort and additional grip. Only a handful of other mice we tested employed rubber on any such surfaces, and only two did as generously. The metal scroll wheels (both vertical and horizontal) also feel solid and satisfying.

All that comfort does not come at the expense of functionality. The wireless MX Master 3 can be connected to three different devices simultaneously, and you can swap between them with a single button. There are two additional buttons as well as a horizontal scroll wheel above the thumb rest. Built right into the thumb rest is a gesture button, which, when held, will allow you to perform a variety of functions when you move the mouse at the same time. For example, holding this button and moving the mouse left or right allows you to swap between programs. The regular scroll wheel has a button built into it as well as a button just behind it. The latter, by default, swaps the scroll style between a smooth, fast scroll and slower line-by-line ratchet scrolling.

To take full advantage of all these extra buttons, you’ll need to download the Logitech Options application (available for Mac and PC). Within it, you’ll find a trove of options for modification. Every additional button (on top of the traditional left and right clickers), as well as the horizontal scroll wheel, can be reprogrammed. You can also make app-specific configurations. For example, we made the horizontal scroll wheel change the brush size in Photoshop and swap between sheets in Microsoft Excel. The gesture button comes with pre-built configurations, such as one for controlling music playback, but you can also customize your setup as well as change things like pointer speed and scroll direction.

Logitech Options also features Logitech Flow, which allows you to move your mouse seamlessly between connected devices. You can even copy and paste files between them. What’s extra cool is that this works across operating systems. To connect a device, you can use the included dongle or simply connect via Bluetooth. We put a desktop PC and a MacBook side by side, pressed Command+C to copy a file of the Mac, moved our cursor seamlessly onto our desktop and pressed Control+V to paste it onto the PC. Never thought we’d experience something like that!

The MX Master has a rechargeable battery, charged with the included USB-A to USB-C cable. And the cable is long enough to use the mouse at the same time that it’s charging, though it can interfere with tracking. We’d recommend juicing up overnight. If you find the battery’s dead but need it in a pinch, a one-minute quick charge provides a whole three hours of use.

Mike Andronico/CNN

We’ve tested several great vertical mice, but we found the Logitech Lift to offer the best combination of comfort, features and value for most people.

The Lift’s vertical design positions your hand at a comfortable 57-degree angle (think reaching out for a handshake) instead of requiring you to rotate your wrist palm downward as you do with a traditional mouse. In our testing we found it easy to grip and get comfortable with right away, even for several of us on staff who don’t use this type of mouse often. Just note that its design is built for medium to small hands — those with larger hands may be better off with the heavier, meatier Logitech MX Vertical. The Lift’s white, graphite and pink options all look attractive and understated, and unlike many other vertical mice we tested, it comes in both left- and right-handed variations.

Logitech’s latest vertical mouse has a total of six buttons, including your standard left/right click, a clickable scroll wheel, a button for adjusting DPI sensitivity and two thumb buttons. The Lift’s main click buttons were silent yet responsive, and we appreciated that the scroll wheel can switch between rapid scrolling and more precise combing with a quick click.

You can also customize the Lift’s four auxiliary buttons via the Logi Options+ software for PC or Mac, giving you the freedom to assign all kinds of shortcuts or keystrokes (such as muting your mic or copying and pasting text). The Lift can pair to up to three devices at once using a mix of Bluetooth and the included Logi Bolt USB receiver — which itself can support up to six Logitech accessories — making it easy to jump between multiple computers and tablets throughout the workday.

One of the Lift’s few drawbacks is that it’s powered by a single AA battery, and it isn’t rechargeable via USB-C (and can’t be used in wired mode) like the MX Vertical is. Logitech promises up to two years of use on a single battery, but you’ll eventually have to replace it. We still recommend the MX Vertical if you have larger hands or don’t want to deal with disposable batteries, but the Lift’s slicker design, lower price, left-handed option and better wireless connectivity give it the edge overall.

We scored each mouse on design and comfort, customization and performance (you can read more below). Seeing as these are ergonomic mice, comfort took up a good portion of our rating scale, but we also placed great emphasis on customization and performance.

We ran a battery of tests on every mouse over sessions lasting up to two hours. We clicked objects of varying sizes, dragged and dropped files, highlighted text and much more. All the while, we noted any strain or discomfort in our hands, on both immediate and long term. We also spent plenty of time getting used to nontraditional mouse formats, specifically trackballs and “vertical” mice with buttons at near-vertical angles. We also looked into the quality of materials that composed each mouse and at battery life, Bluetooth connection and warranties. Finally, we explored every customization option, such as extra buttons, the amount of functionality available and downloadable software.

Check out our category breakdown below.

Design and comfort

  • Overall design: We checked out the build of the mouse in detail, both visually and in-hand. Specifically, we noted the mouse’s architecture and button placement. We also noted how many additional buttons there were, and where they were located.
  • Comfort: We spent about two hours with the mouse (after getting used to its weight and controls), concentrating on both short-term and long-term strain. An example of short-term strain would be if a button is difficult to reach with the nearest finger. An example of long-term strain would be discomfort in specific parts of the hand after using the mouse for the full session. We also noted any wrist strain over the long term.
  • Materials used: We researched material composition and quality. In part, this boiled down to how plastic, rubber, buttons and scroll wheels felt in our hands.

Customization

  • Customization: We delved into every customization option available for each mouse, including those provided by accompanying software. This included additional buttons, different modes of use, physical modifications available, gesture controls and more.

Performance

  • Overall use: We noted every quirk, good and bad, while using each mouse: how smooth tracking and scrolling were, how easy it was to access every button, how well we could hold the mouse, etc. We also described how much effort it took to learn to use nontraditional modes such as trackball and vertical mice (the latter of which is characterized by primary buttons that are at an exceptionally steep angle on one side).
  • Bluetooth: We rated the connection quality of the mouse, how many devices could be connected at once and whether a dongle was required or included. In terms of connection quality, we mainly looked for any latency between mouse movement and cursor movement on the screen.
  • Battery: We considered what kind of battery/batteries were required and how long they were expected to last. Some mice had an internal battery that could be recharged or even supported fast charging.

Warranty

  • Warranty: We looked into what warranty/warranties covered each mouse.

The SwiftPoint ProPoint Ergonomic Mouse & Presenter SM600 is unlike any Bluetooth mouse we’ve ever used. It fits right in the palm of your hand, as it’s less than 2 inches from end to end. It’s designed with two alcoves on the left and right for your thumb and middle finger, respectively. A ridge in the middle holds the buttons, controlled by your index finger. You can also tilt it on its side to use gesture controls. Despite its size, this mouse is genuinely comfortable through and through — and it’s much easier to control than you might imagine. Plus, it doubles as a presenter that you can point at your screen to control slideshows. You can pick up the free SwiftPoint P3 Control Panel on most operating systems, which allows you to customize all the controls and see your own mouse usage statistics.

Overall, we loved this mouse. It’s compact and portable, yet it packs ergonomics better than many normal-size mice. However, we had to pass it up as, compared to the Logitech MX Master 3, there isn’t much material for your fingers to rest upon, so they have to stay bent rather than fully relaxed. And as good as the customization software is, the MX Master simply features more buttons to modify.

The Logitech MX Vertical is a vertical mouse, meaning its primary buttons rest on the side at a steep angle. This mouse looks almost like a fossil, with a large, gently twisting region for your hand to grip. This area peaks with a long, ovular shape pointing at a 45-degree angle. On the right side, which is flat and halfway vertical, are the main buttons and the scroll wheel. On the left side, which is concave, are two thumb buttons. That ovular area contains yet another button within reach of the thumb. Like the MX Master, most of the area you’ll grip is covered in a comfortable ribbed rubber. To customize the buttons, you can take advantage of Logitech Options, software that works on Mac and PC.

Despite being so well constructed, the Logitech MX Vertical features little curvature on the actual clicking surface. Since it’s flat, you need to more actively grip the mouse to keep your hand on it. Relative to resting our hand on the Logitech MX Master 3, this was not nearly as comfortable. Plus, the MX Vertical features fewer additional controls to take advantage of.

The Logitech MX Ergo scored just below the Logitech MX Master 3. It’s a trackball mouse, featuring a sizable, accurate ball on the left side. Your palm and some of your fingers are treated to the same soft rubber as that of the MX Vertical and MX Master. The mouse is wide, with a gentle curve that ends with a groove on the right side for your ring finger. On the bottom is a metal plate that anchors the MX Ergo nicely, but also acts as a pivot to change the angle of the mouse from flat to 20 degrees tilted right. We loved this unique inclusion. The MX Ergo features two additional buttons beside your index finger, as well as a button to set the trackball to precision mode. This lowers the tracking speed greatly, greatly increasing precision on an already accurate trackball. You can download Logitech Options to customize every extra button.

The MX Master narrowly beat the MX Ergo due in part to its more precisely sculpted shape. The MX Master also has a horizontal scroll wheel, which the MX Ergo lacks. Despite these minor differences, the Logitech MX Ergo is exceptionally ergonomic — a great pick if you prefer trackball mice.

The Logitech MX Anywhere 2S has a simpler design that placed it lower than its Logitech companions on ergonomics. It’s under 4 inches long, featuring a gentle slope along the surface and a small groove on the left side for your thumb. Only the thumb area and a similar groove on the right side feature rubber; the rest is Logitech’s quality plastic. Above the thumb region are two additional buttons, as well as a button behind the scroll wheel. Overall, the main draw with this mouse appears to be portability. But there are nuances, such as the thumb groove and some subtle troughs along the primary buttons, that provide ergonomic support. Plus, you can customize the extra buttons with the Logitech Options program for Mac and PC.

All in all, the MX Anywhere features minimal attention to ergonomics compared to the other mice we tested. It also throws in fewer additional controls than the Logitech MX Master 3.

The Kensington Pro Fit Ergo Vertical Wireless Trackball came third on the scoreboard. The first thing you’ll notice is a large trackball facing upward at about a 70-degree angle. Along the right side, the mouse curves and winds to fit your grip very well. At the end of this curvature are the main mouse buttons, which rest at a steep, sloping angle. On the left side of the mouse is a wholly vertical area upon which your thumb can grip. Above the thumb region are three extra buttons, and to the left of the index finger are two more. All of these buttons can be customized via the KensingtonWorks program, available for Mac and PC.

This mouse was certainly ergonomic, given its combination of a vertical design, generous trackball size and finely curved structure. But a primary issue that arose was the accuracy of the trackball. In large motion it was fine, but during more precise movements like highlighting text, tracking was a little choppy. We missed the precision offered by the Logitech MX Ergo. Plus, the MX Ergo features a more comfortable rubber coating and overall higher quality construction.

The Kensington Pro Fit Ergo Vertical Wireless Mouse is another example of a very finely crafted device. The mouse is designed to be gripped by your entire hand. The right side features a warped looking curve full of grooves and peaks that, when held, perfectly cradle your fingers. The left side also features a wide trough for your thumb. To borrow an analogy we used before, it’s like holding a piece of clay molded to the human hand. In terms of extra buttons, there are two above the thumb and one behind the scrolling mechanism. We say mechanism because, in place of a wheel, this device has a scroll ball, though it still only scrolls vertically. To customize the buttons, you can download the multi-OS KensingtonWorks program.

Despite being so incredibly well sculpted, this Kensington mouse controls somewhat awkwardly. With your grip entirely on the mouse, it takes a tremendous amount of acclimation if you’re used to traditional mice. Normally, your fingers might take part in the more precise movement of the mouse, but to take full advantage of the ergonomic structure, you’ll have to rely on your arm for such movements. And those of us with larger hands also overshot some of the buttons when fully gripping this mouse, making it a little awkward in our hands.

The Microsoft Surface Mouse takes a much more minimalist approach than the other mice we tested, leading to some shortcomings on the ergonomics front. It’s shaped very much like a traditional mouse, with a simple, bulbous slope from front to back. This more steep slope fits the hand a little better, but the only finger that actually gets special attention is the thumb. On the left side of the mouse is a flattened, rubber area upon which your thumb can rest. Above this thumb region are three additional buttons. There’s also a button behind the scroll wheel. To customize these buttons, and even assign macros to them, you can download the PC-only Microsoft Mouse and Keyboard Center software.

As we mentioned, this mouse’s greatest downfall is its minimalism. While it looks sleek, and doesn’t even require a dongle, it does not provide much sculpted support for most of your fingers. Over longer sessions, we felt stiffness in our clicking fingers as a result. Plus, its software is PC-centric, cutting out a significant portion of its potential user base.

The AmazonBasics Full-Size Ergonomic Wireless Mouse is a good attempt at an affordable ergonomic mouse. Its shape is what we’d call traditional with a twist. The main buttons feature an uneven slope that accommodates for the different lengths of the index and middle finger. Plus, there’s a concave region on the left for your thumb. On the right, there’s a similar region that the ring and pinky fingers can at least grip onto. Above the thumb are three additional buttons (one of which we could not find a function). Beneath the thumb is a button that opens the Windows start menu. And finally, there’s a button behind the scroll wheel. Unfortunately, we could not find any customization software to go along with this mouse.

The AmazonBasics mouse features an ergonomic design, but it is still far less nuanced than that of the Logitech MX Master 3. And its material construction feels much cheaper, even creating a sharp edge on the right side that can dig into your ring finger at times. On top of not having accompanying software, this mouse appeared to utilize mouse acceleration. This is a function that attempts to smooth out mouse movement, which ends up making this mouse feel slightly less accurate and responsive than the MX Master.

Note: The prices above reflect the retailers’ listed price at the time of publication.

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best ergonomic mice / Habr

Most recently, we talked about interesting and comfortable ergonomic keyboards. Their task is to reduce the load on the hands and increase the efficiency of work, whether it is coding or typing. There are so many keyboards that we decided to split the selection into two parts, although we will probably release a third as well, since several cool devices are left behind.

But today we are not talking about keyboards, but about computer mice. Some of them are very different from the standard we are used to. A couple and do not look like mice at all. Under the cut are mice that seem to deserve attention.

Logitech MX Vertical

One of the most unusual mice in appearance, the developers of which claim that the device reduces the load on the muscles of the hand and forearm by 10-20%. It would be nice to know how they determined this, but the reviews about the device are really good.

At the same time, the position of the hand that is placed on the mouse is unusual – after all, the angle of inclination is 57 degrees. At the same time, all the usual controls are in place – buttons, a wheel, etc. The thumb received a separate place for itself, where it is located during work. The surface of the mouse is embossed, so that the fingers do not slip during operation.

The body of the mouse is made of rubber and aluminum. Connection – both wired and wireless (Bluetooth), so the mouse is suitable for different categories of users.

Sensor resolution 4,000 dpi.

Anker Wireless Vertical

Very similar to the previous model, a mouse from another manufacturer, called Anker Wireless Vertical. Its characteristics, including positioning accuracy, are similar to the mouse from Logitech, but at the same time the price is lower.

Wireless mouse, communication module works without problems. The case is strong, without backlash and any shortcomings. The only thing is that it is vertical, like the model from Logitech. Both the first and the second models will have to adapt for some time, although the period of adaptation cannot be called particularly long.

Users of this mouse say that it is not suitable for a small hand because the body is quite large. On the case there is a transparent insert with LEDs inside. It shows when the mouse is working normally and when it is running low. In the latter case, the LEDs change color to red.

Sensor resolution – 1.600 dpi (3 levels). If no one touches the mouse for about eight minutes, it goes into standby mode.

Microsoft Sculpt

Another mouse with a non-standard angle for the hand, although it is already more traditional than previous models. It is minimalistic, the shape is rounded, which provides reliable support for the user’s palm.

The mouse has a thumb rest and is designed so that the user’s wrist is not constantly on the table surface. According to the developers, this allows you to use the muscles of the forearm, which greatly reduces the risk of problems with the hand like tunnel syndrome.

The mouse has start menu buttons, forward and back buttons, and a scroll wheel.

This is a completely wireless mouse, there is no cable connection option. It runs on two AA batteries. By the way, according to the experience with this mouse, there is one remark – it has a rather large dongle that protrudes far beyond the edge of the USB port, so you should be careful when you put a laptop with this dongle in your bag. It is best to take it out when transporting the laptop.

Logitech M570

An even more unusual mouse than all the previous ones. How is it different from other devices? It is combined with a trackball, which is analogous to a conventional computer mouse. It does not need to be moved around the table to move the cursor, the ball rotates with your finger.

In the case of the mouse, the trackball is on the outside side. The M570 is a portable and ergonomic trackball with five buttons.

I didn’t have to deal with this device – if one of the readers tried it, tell us what you liked or, conversely, didn’t like. It is not so easy to adapt to the trackball, but once you have learned how to work with it, the user solves typical tasks without any problems. True, playing with such a device is not so easy, but adaptation is also needed here.

Wireless device, it was released many years ago, but is still available – as far as I know, many developers, designers and representatives of other IT specialties work with it.

Jelly Comb Ergonomic

Several mouse models listed above are not suitable for people with small hands. But Jelly Comb Ergonomic is the perfect option for them. It is a small size wireless vertical mouse with a comfortable grip.

It has several sensor resolution modes that can be changed: 1000, 1600, or 2400 dpi. The mouse has a built-in battery that charges in about an hour, after which it lasts for a couple of months.

The mouse has two side buttons, scroll wheel, battery indicator.

Swiftpoint GT

It is difficult to call this device a mouse, looking at it for the first time. But that is exactly what he is. The Swiftpoint GT is the product of a young company that launched a Kickstarter fundraiser and received money to mass-produce this mouse.

Probably, such a mouse is difficult to recommend for many hours of daily work. But for business trips, trips around the city or a short working session somewhere in a cafe – that’s it. The mouse is so small that it even fits in your pocket, without really protruding it.

The device works both via Bluetooth and when connected via cable. Up to 100% it is charged in just a couple of hours.

The quietest computer mice: top best models

Whatever you say, a computer is a rather noisy device. The hum of the cooling system, keyboard clicks, mouse button clicks… it’s no surprise that many gamers sooner or later start looking for ways to reduce the noise from their PC. There are many options: invest in good fans or even switch to passive cooling of components, buy a keyboard with quiet switches, and finally choose a silent mouse. We will talk about the latter in this article.

Actually, “silent gaming mouse” is an oxymoron: gaming devices use mechanical switches that just can’t help clicking. Here you have to choose – either silence, or quality, response speed and reliability.

Therefore, our top silent mice are filled mainly with office gadgets. Fortunately, many of them are very cheap, and you can get, for example, a quiet device for work in addition to the classic clicky gaming mouse. So, here’s what the market has to offer at the moment.

Xiaomi MIIIW Wireless Mouse Silent

Wireless and perhaps the quietest mouse on our list. Connects to a PC via Bluetooth, powered by a couple of batteries, works at a distance of up to 8 meters from the device. The main advantage of the device is an almost silent click, almost inaudible even at a short distance. A great option for those who work at night and don’t want to disturb their roommates.

Trust Mydo Silent Click

Silent PC mouse with optical sensor and symmetrical design. You can connect it to your computer using the bundled dongle, while the gadget does not require driver installation or configuration. The resolution of the mouse sensor is only 1800 dpi, so you should not expect outstanding results in competitive shooters.

Xiaomi Mi Dual Mode Wireless Mouse Silent Edition

Another mouse from Xiaomi in our rating, an ideal “rodent” for office work – with an ergonomic design, dual connection mode (the device can be hooked up to two devices and quickly switch between them), effective noise reduction of clicks, as well as extremely low power consumption: the mouse can work up to 12 months on one set of batteries! It is unlikely that you will use it for games, but in work it will show itself at its best.

Logitech M350 Wireless

Wireless mouse with a sleek design and quiet buttons. Connects via Bluetooth and radio, runs on a single battery for a very long time, compact and ergonomic, but for owners of large palms it may seem too small.

Logitech M330 Silent Plus Wireless

This model is larger than the previous one, but is as quiet as the M350. Its design is great for palm grip, soft pads on the sides will allow you to firmly hold the mouse in your hands, and high-quality noise reduction will eliminate loud clicks. At the same time, the Logitech M330 Silent Plus Wireless runs on a single battery and holds a charge for a long time, and therefore it can be used at work both at home and in the office.

SmartBuy SBM-612AG-RK

Inexpensive optical mouse with a very quiet click and radio connection. The model offers a sensor resolution of up to 2000 dpi, which means you can compete with rivals in online shooters. On the other hand, it will not seriously compete with gaming mice, so we recommend using it for work, not games.

JETACCESS R95 BT

The JETACCESS R95 BT features a stylish, fast-paced design and a wide range of connectivity options – Bluetooth wireless and 2.4 GHz available, as well as a wired PC connection. Thanks to the silent keys and the wheel, the device will ensure quiet operation in any conditions.

Logitech M590 Wireless

Another silent mouse that boasts a dual mode of operation: you can connect it to your PC and laptop at the same time and quickly switch between them, eliminating the need to waste time pairing. Other features include an ergonomic shape, additional keys and, of course, the complete absence of audible clicks.

Speedlink Cius

Another office “rodent”: compact, cute, unfortunately not playful. The surface of the mouse is covered with fabric, which contributes to the grip and prevents slipping from sweaty hands. In addition, there is a beautiful backlight and soft-touch plastic on the sides that are pleasant to the touch. Finally, the gadget is very small: it won’t take up much space in a bag or backpack, but it may still not be very comfortable for large hands.

Gembird MUSW-420

Gembird MUSW-420 not only costs a penny, but also looks stylish, combining two-tone inserts and a dynamic design. The mouse connects wirelessly to a PC and is also very quiet, which will help save you and your colleagues from annoying clicks.

A4Tech Fstyler FG30S

The A4Tech Fstyler FG30S model has an ergonomic shape, a wireless connection interface, a polling rate of 125 Hz and a sensor resolution of 2000 dpi, which, although with a stretch, gives reason to consider it a little gaming. The mouse works silently, but is demanding on the surface: it is advisable to use a mousepad to prevent sensor breakdowns.

Trust MaxTrack

Trust MaxTrack draws attention with its “racing” design, but you will not achieve high speed from it: the maximum resolution is 1600 dpi. However, the manufacturer relies on other parameters: ergonomic shape, no noise, low price.

Red Square Ergonomica

This budget gaming mouse boasts vibrant colors, the highest dpi among the models listed in the selection, and a high polling rate.